Ras protein


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Related to Ras protein: GTPase, G protein

Ras protein

or ras protein  (răs)
n.
Any of a group of proteins that are found near cell membranes and regulate cell division and proliferation. Abnormal Ras proteins facilitate uncontrolled cell division, leading to the development of tumors.

[ra(t) s(arcoma), from the fact that genes coding for abnormal ras proteins were first isolated from rat sarcomas.]
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AMR-MeOAc treatment reduced Ras activation in a time-dependent manner, while it did not affect total Ras protein expression (Fig.
We also showed that let-7 was produced at low concentrations in lung tumor samples relative to those of normal lung tissue from the same patient, whereas the concentration of RAS protein was significantly higher in lung tumors.
Following a weak signal, not enough of the Ras protein is activated, so the T cell won't take any action.
Found in 30 percent of all human cancer tumours, the Ras protein literally 'drives cells crazy,' says Prof.
8,9] In the study by Freer et al,[8] normal mucosa and verrucous carcinoma showed significant expression of p21 Ras protein, but a marked decrease in the detectable amounts of this protein in more undifferentiated cells.
The Roswell Park researchers worked with investigators from the National Cancer institute to design the study, basing their assumptions on preclinical evidence that a special vaccine against this mutant RAS protein could effectively "jump-start" a weakened immune system to fight the disease.
A molecular biologist who is internationally renowned for his work on the RAS signaling pathway, McCormick is leading the National Cancer Institute s RAS Project, a new laboratory that will focus on the mutated RAS protein, which plays a key role in a third of all cancers.
The TAU researchers are trying to discover the mechanisms whereby the Ras protein is transferred, and their initial findings seem to be promising.
Salirasib is the first in a new class of compounds called "rasibs" that inhibit overactive cell growth due to a mutation of the Ras protein.
These researchers searched fruitlessly for an antidote to the Ras protein for almost a decade, recalls Allen Oliff, executive director for cancer research at Merck.