rascal


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ras·cal

 (răs′kəl)
n.
1. One that is playfully mischievous.
2. An unscrupulous, dishonest person; a scoundrel.
adj. Archaic
Made up of, belonging to, or relating to the lower classes: "Nor shall the Rascal Rabble here have Peace" (John Dryden).

[Middle English rascaile, rabble, commoners, from Old French rascaille, probably from rasque, mud, from Vulgar Latin *rāsicāre, to scrape; see rash2.]

ras′cal·ly adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rascal

(ˈrɑːskəl)
n
1. a disreputable person; villain
2. a mischievous or impish rogue
3. an affectionate or mildly reproving term for a child or old man: you little rascal; the wicked old rascal kissed her.
4. obsolete a person of lowly birth
adj
(prenominal) obsolete
a. belonging to the mob or rabble
b. dishonest; knavish
[C14: from Old French rascaille rabble, perhaps from Old Norman French rasque mud, filth]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ras•cal

(ˈræs kəl)

n.
1. a dishonest or unscrupulous person.
2. a mischievous person or animal.
[1300–50; Middle English rascaile, raskaille < Old French rascaille rabble; perhaps akin to rash2]
syn: See knave.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Rascal

 the rabble collectively; a mob, as of camp followers; ill-conditioned beasts, as deer. See also rascality.
Examples: rascal of boys, 1470; of the city, 1494; of the people, 1561.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rascal - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrelrascal - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
scoundrel, villain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
2.rascal - one who is playfully mischievousrascal - one who is playfully mischievous  
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
brat, holy terror, little terror, terror - a very troublesome child
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

rascal

noun rogue, devil, villain, scoundrel, disgrace, rake, pickle (Brit. informal), imp, scally (Northwest English dialect), wretch, knave (archaic), ne'er-do-well, reprobate, scallywag (informal), good-for-nothing, miscreant, scamp, wastrel, bad egg (old-fashioned informal), blackguard, varmint (informal), rapscallion, caitiff (archaic), wrong 'un (informal) What's that old rascal been telling you?
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

rascal

noun
One who causes minor trouble or damage:
Informal: cutup.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نَذْل
uličník
slyngel
csirkefogó
prakkari
blēdispalaidnis
kerataserseriyaramaz kişi

rascal

[ˈrɑːskəl] N (= scoundrel) → granuja mf; (= child) → granuja mf, pillo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rascal

[ˈrɑːskəl] nvaurien m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rascal

nGauner m; (= child)Schlingel m, → Frechdachs m; (old: = scoundrel) → Schurke m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rascal

[ˈrɑːskl] n (scoundrel) → mascalzone m; (child) → birbante m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

rascal

(ˈraːskəl) noun
a cheeky or naughty person, especially a child. a cheeky little rascal.
ˈrascally adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Fix," replied the consul, "I shall not be sorry to see the rascal's face; but perhaps he won't come here--that is, if he is the person you suppose him to be.
'Am I going to keep a clerk for my own pleasure, or because of my own wish, you provoking rascal!' said Mr Brass, putting his pen in his mouth, and grinning spitefully at his sister.
It may be observed in this place, lest the fact of Mr Brass calling a lady a rascal, should occasion any wonderment or surprise, that he was so habituated to having her near him in a man's capacity, that he had gradually accustomed himself to talk to her as though she were really a man.
"Eh, you rascal!" Pierre heard the same kind voice saying at the other end of the shed.
"Dear me, how near I came to being a rascal. I mean, that I am greatly obliged to you."
We approached him, of course, through persons who were to be trusted to represent us, without betraying the source from which their instructions were derived; and we found the old rascal's advice well worth paying for.
To which the other answered, "That he would have him keep the rascal away from his house, and that he would go and lock up the wench; for he was resolved to make her marry Mr Blifil in spite of her teeth." He then shook Blifil by the hand, and swore he would have no other son-in-law.
In the meantime that rascal, Pinocchio, free now from the clutches of the Carabineer, was running wildly across fields and meadows, taking one short cut after another toward home.
I remember one adventurous little fellow--Too-Too was the rascal's name--who had built himself a sort of aerial baby-house in the picturesque tuft of a tree adjoining Marheyo's habitation.
No time was lost in this being done, despite the rascals' cries and protestations that the old lady was in their debt, that she had cheated them, and that her general behaviour had been mean and dishonourable.
"Stand by, you lazy rascals!" she called to the soldiers.
"O, you rebel rascals!" perhaps the soldiers would reply, glaring fiercely at the young men.