raticide

raticide

(ˈrætɪˌsaɪd)
n
a rat poison
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rat•i•cide

(ˈræt əˌsaɪd)

n.
a substance for killing rats.
[1840–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

raticide

n (spec)Rattengift nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Cuba has shipped 3.3 tons of Biorat, a raticide, to Nicaragua to help fight a plague that threatens to cause a possible epidemic of leptospirosis, reports Xinhua News Agency (June 23, 1999).
There are countless substances that may be used as a means for suicide attempts, like pesticides, raticide, abuse drugs, beyond foods and others.
The pesticide inhibitor of cholinesterase, traded illegally as raticide ("chumbinho") was most frequently used (13.5%) as single toxic substance.
Farmers who agree to spare at least 970 square meters of their farmland from herbicides, raticides, and animal traps will receive a reward of NT$20,000 per hectare.
Despite this controversy, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) adopts the generic term pesticides, classifying them according to their function: insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, defoliants, bactericides, and raticides (17,18).
"This year we saw around 20-30 [poisoning] cases, 10 deadly, not all from Lanatte, we had raticides also," he said.
Il faut preciser que le Maroc utilise annuellement 14 mille tonnes de pesticides (herbicides, fongicides, insecticides, acaricides, raticides, nematicides et molluscides) qui contribuent sans aucun doute a la protection des cultures et a l'amelioration de la production agricole.