ratiocination


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Related to ratiocination: syllogism

ra·ti·oc·i·nate

 (răsh′ē-ŏs′ə-nāt′)
intr.v. ra·ti·oc·i·nat·ed, ra·ti·oc·i·nat·ing, ra·ti·oc·i·nates
To reason methodically and logically.

[Latin ratiōcinārī, ratiōcināt-, from ratiō, calculation; see ratio.]

ra′ti·oc′i·na′tion n.
ra′ti·oc′i·na′tor n.

ratiocination

the process of logical reasoning or rational thought. — ratiocinative, adj.
See also: Thinking
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ratiocination - the proposition arrived at by logical reasoning (such as the proposition that must follow from the major and minor premises of a syllogism)
syllogism - deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false
major term - the term in a syllogism that is the predicate of the conclusion
minor term - the term in a syllogism that is the subject of the conclusion
2.ratiocination - logical and methodical reasoning
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical

ratiocination

noun
Exact, valid, and rational reasoning:
Translations

ratiocination

[ˌrætɪɒsɪˈneɪʃən] N (frm) → raciocinación f
References in classic literature ?
When it is impossible to stretch the very elastic threads of historical ratiocination any farther, when actions are clearly contrary to all that humanity calls right or even just, the historians produce a saving conception of "greatness." "Greatness," it seems, excludes the standards of right and wrong.
Found in a Bottle," "A Descent Into a Maelstrom" and "The Balloon Hoax"; such tales of conscience as "William Wilson," "The Black Cat" and "The Tell-tale Heart," wherein the retributions of remorse are portrayed with an awful fidelity; such tales of natural beauty as "The Island of the Fay" and "The Domain of Arnheim"; such marvellous studies in ratiocination as the "Gold-bug," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Purloined Letter" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget," the latter, a recital of fact, demonstrating the author's wonderful capability of correctly analyzing the mysteries of the human mind; such tales of illusion and banter as "The Premature Burial" and "The System of Dr.
We know that for logicians (formerly at any rate) the concept is the simple and primitive element; next comes the judgment, uniting two or several concepts; then ratiocination, combining two or several judgments.
If this sounds like the reworking of the stuff that nineteenth-century fictions are made of, it is meant that way: the omnipresent oppressiveness of the city, as well as the delightful circumlocution of the narrative, are reminiscent of Dickens; the morbid subject matter and intuitive brilliance of the police officer solving the case suggest Poe's Gothic ratiocination; and the scientific rivalry between Sartorius and his colleagues, as well as the search for the elixir of life, recall Hawthorne's hybristic scientists.
Aphorisms are insights shorn of supporting ratiocination. Sometimes they are arrived at in an instant, in a sudden illumination; sometimes, as Lichtenberg's draftings and redraftings of the same phrase or idea reveals, they are arrived at through a process of intellectual and rhetorical honing.
Similarly, her fourth chapter on women's intellectual writing in the romantic era usefully reminds us of the large body of "textual evidence of sustained ratiocination" by women in the romantic era, but again covers well-trodden ground, drawing heavily on Sylvia Harcstock Myers' book on the Bluestockings.
The cognition modules (both epistemic and practical) contain two types of "mechanisms." One type is ratiocination, which is very general and slow.
The invariability of this formula accounts in large part for the continued popularity of such writers as Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie and their rituals of ratiocination. Each of the novels in Auster's The New York Trilogy follows the pattern by introducing the detective figure and the case he has to solve.(2) In City of Glass Daniel Quinn is hired by Virginia Stillman to follow her father-in-law, Peter Stillman, who has been in a mental hospital for fifteen years for keeping his son locked up in solitary confinement throughout his childhood.
Whitehead concurs: "Hill's poetry recalls most acutely the somber music of Allen Tate, who was aware early of the new trends but whose late work, even, is strictly of the older tradition." Ironically, the trajectory of Hill's work traces an arc opposite to Tate's, beginning with the lapidary forms and dense ratiocination that Tate employed and curving backwards toward Poundian modernism with its willful opacity and fragmentation.
For Aller a Elisabethville focuses on the primacy, in human beings and especially children, of perception, of emotion, of playing, of fantasy--as opposed to ratiocination. Set during a time when one might expect reality to be so perpetually overwhelming that it is inescapable, the novel instead mirrors the child's experiencing of a sort of separateness or prolonged self-abstraction from brute facts.
Now, it is equally true that, as early as 1926, the good lyric poet Peter Gan praised Rilke's "arduously wrested, incomparable ability to voice finenesses, uniquenesses, nuances of feelings and thoughts that hitherto were lost in the ocean of the ineffable," a perception echoed in 1975 by Marcel Reich-Ranicki, Germany's leading critic, as Rilke's "triumph in the struggle with the unsayable." Something similar was expressed even better back in 1925 by the eminent poet-critic Oskar Loerke, for whom Rilke "increased with all his words the treasure of silence." Loerke also averred that philosophy could express itself better through associations than through ratiocination, which quickly exhausts itself.
ratiocination. Mill's view of liberty is at once far too simplistic and far too rigorous.