rationalism

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ra·tion·al·ism

 (răsh′ə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Reliance on reason as the best guide for belief and action.
2. Philosophy The theory that the exercise of reason, rather than experience, authority, or spiritual revelation, provides the primary basis for knowledge.

ra′tion·al·ist n.
ra′tion·al·is′tic adj.
ra′tion·al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rationalism

(ˈræʃənəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. reliance on reason rather than intuition to justify one's beliefs or actions
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that knowledge about reality can be obtained by reason alone without recourse to experience
b. the doctrine that human knowledge can all be encompassed within a single, usually deductive, system
c. the school of philosophy initiated by Descartes which held both the above doctrines
3. the belief that knowledge and truth are ascertained by rational thought and not by divine or supernatural revelation
ˈrationalist n
ˌrationalˈistic adj
ˌrationalˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ra•tion•al•ism

(ˈræʃ ə nlˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or habit of accepting reason as the supreme authority in matters of opinion, belief, or conduct.
2.
a. a philosophic doctrine that reason alone is a source of knowledge and is independent of experience.
b. a doctrine that all knowledge is expressible in self-evident propositions or their consequences.
3. a doctrine that human reason, unaided by divine revelation, is an adequate or the sole guide to all attainable religious truth.
[1790–1800]
ra′tion•al•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

rationalism

1. the doctrine that knowledge is gained only through the reason, a faculty independent of experience.
2. the doctrine that all knowledge is expressible in self-evident propositions or their consequences. — rationalist, n.rationalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rationalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge is acquired by reason without resort to experience
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.rationalism - the theological doctrine that human reason rather than divine revelation establishes religious truth
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
deism, free thought - the form of theological rationalism that believes in God on the basis of reason without reference to revelation
3.rationalism - the doctrine that reason is the right basis for regulating conduct
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
racionalismus
racionalizam

rationalism

[ˈræʃnəlɪzəm] Nracionalismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rationalism

[ˈræʃənəlɪzəm] nrationalisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rationalism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rationalism

[ˌræʃənəˌlɪzəm] nrazionalismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
When Christian ideas succumbed in the 18th century to rationalist ideas, feudal society fought its death battle with the then revolutionary bourgeoisie.
Continue reading "Power and the Rationalists " at...
Summary: Kochi (Kerala) [India], Sep 14 (ANI): The Missionaries of Jesus on Friday, on the basis of the findings unearthed by its inquiry commission, stated that the nuns who were protesting against Bishop of Jalandhar, Franco Mulakkal, were influenced by the "thoughts of rationalists."
IANS Mumbai In shocking revelations, an NCP leader and other leading rationalists were on the hit-list of the recently arrested Hindu right-wing activists in connection with the Palghar arms seizure case, the Maharashtra ATS told a Mumbai court on Friday.
For instance, noted journalist and a well-known critic of the right wing, Gauri Lankesh, was killed in September 2017, in a similar way as rationalists Narendra Dabholkar, MM Kalburgi and Govind Pansare.
'Sir Syed was one of the less discussed intellectuals in previous five decades and both rationalists and non-rationalists can be pointed for this negligence' said Iftikhar Arif in his address to the seminar.
Renowned literary figure Iftikhar Arif said, 'Sir Syed was one of the less discussed intellectuals in previous five decades and both rationalists and non-rationalists can be pointed for this negligence'.
Before his murder, two other rationalists - Narendra Dabholkar and Govind Pansare - were killed in Maharashtra.
For some liberals (whom Levy dubs "rationalists"), the main dangers are from traditionalist communities, whether local, sectarian or familial.
However, the CID is of the view that suspects, who killed other rationalists Narendra Dabholkar and Govind Pansare, were responsible for Dr Kalburgi's death.
In like vein, Levy argues that the rationalists are right to "expect groups to exercise more power over their members than can be justified by their free associational choices"; but that the pluralists are likewise right to "expect states to exercise more power over groups than can be justified by the freedom of groups' members." Hence, while Levy himself leans a bit more to the pluralist side of the divide, the purpose of his book is to urge us to keep both rationalist and
They had a common denominator: rationalists. There is one more thing that threads them together now.