rationally


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ra·tion·al

 (răsh′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Having or exercising the ability to reason. See Synonyms at logical.
2. Consistent with or based on reason or good judgment; logical or sensible: rational decisions.
3. Of sound mind; sane: wondered if the eccentric neighbor was not completely rational.
4. Mathematics Capable of being expressed as a quotient of integers.
n. Mathematics
A rational number.

[Middle English racional, from Old French racionel, from Latin ratiōnālis, from ratiō, ratiōn-, reason; see reason.]

ra′tion·al·ly adv.
ra′tion·al·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.rationally - in a rational manner; "we must act rationally"
irrationally - in an irrational manner; "they acted irrationally"
Translations
بصورَةٍ مَنطِقِيَّه
logicky
fornuftigt
skynsamlega
mantıksal olarak

rationally

[ˈræʃnəlɪ] ADVracionalmente

rationally

[ˈræʃənəli] adv [think, behave, act] → rationnellementration book ncarnet m de rationnementration card ncarte f de rationnementration coupon ncarte f de rationnement

rationally

adv act, behave, thinkvernünftig, rational; (Med) → bei klarem Verstand; rationally (speaking), it should be possible to do itrational gesehen sollte es möglich sein

rationally

[ˈræʃnəlɪ] adv (behave, speak, think) → razionalmente

rational

(ˈraʃənl) adjective
1. able to think, reason and judge etc. Man is a rational animal.
2. sensible; reasonable; logical; not (over-) influenced by emotions etc. There must be a rational explanation for those strange noises
ˈrationally adverb
ˌrationˈality noun
References in classic literature ?
I have heard it all very rationally explained by your cousin—”
nephew," exclaimed the canon, "if your wife were here, you would behave more rationally."
Tulliver was in his principle that water was water, and in the direct inference that Pivart had not a leg to stand on in this affair of irrigation, he had an uncomfortable suspicion that Wakem had more law to show against this (rationally) irrefragable inference than Gore could show for it.
"I would be quiet if he liked, and as to talking rationally, I flattered myself I was doing that now."
Some of the young clerks, who were making their first voyage, and to whom everything was new and strange, were, very rationally, in the habit of taking notes and keeping journals.
The attempt to express spiritual ideas through the medium of the secular epic, with its battles and councils and all the forms of physical life, is of course rationally paradoxical.
The chaplain resolved to try the experiment, and obtaining access to the madman conversed with him for an hour or more, during the whole of which time he never uttered a word that was incoherent or absurd, but, on the contrary, spoke so rationally that the chaplain was compelled to believe him to be sane.
Price, or the good offices of Rebecca, everything was rationally and duly accomplished, and the girls were ready for the morrow.
'Five minutes ago Hareton seemed a personification of my youth, not a human being; I felt to him in such a variety of ways, that it would have been impossible to have accosted him rationally. In the first place, his startling likeness to Catherine connected him fearfully with her.
Seven-tenths of the free popula- tion of the country were of just their class and degree: small "independent" farmers, artisans, etc.; which is to say, they were the nation, the actual Nation; they were about all of it that was useful, or worth sav- ing, or really respect-worthy, and to subtract them would have been to subtract the Nation and leave behind some dregs, some refuse, in the shape of a king, nobility and gentry, idle, unproductive, acquainted mainly with the arts of wasting and destroying, and of no sort of use or value in any rationally constructed world.
It is almost impossible to say if he ever had considered the event rationally. The avatar of de Barral into Mr.
The first heedless scheme had been to go in the morning and return at night; but to this Mr Musgrove, for the sake of his horses, would not consent; and when it came to be rationally considered, a day in the middle of November would not leave much time for seeing a new place, after deducting seven hours, as the nature of the country required, for going and returning.