raw deal


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raw

 (rô)
adj. raw·er, raw·est
1.
a. Uncooked: raw meat.
b. Being in a natural condition; not processed or refined: raw wool.
c. Not finished, covered, or coated: raw wood.
d. Not having been subjected to adjustment, treatment, or analysis: raw data; the raw cost of production.
e. Undeveloped or unused: raw land.
f. Recently finished; fresh: raw plaster.
2. Inexperienced or untrained: a raw youth; raw recruits.
3.
a. Having subcutaneous tissue exposed: a raw wound.
b. Inflamed; sore: a raw throat.
4. Unpleasantly damp and chilly: raw weather.
5.
a. Powerfully impressive; stark: raw beauty; raw talent.
b. Direct in description and explicit in realistic detail: the film's raw depiction of urban poverty.
c. Crude, vulgar, or coarse: raw language.
6. Nude; naked: was standing there raw.
7.
a. Engaged in without the protection of a condom.
b. Done in a rough or unrestrained manner. Used of sex.
adv.
Slang Without a condom; unprotected.
Idioms:
in the raw
1. In a crude or unrefined state: nature in the raw.
2. Nude; naked.
raw deal
An instance of unfair treatment: got a raw deal from our insurance company.

[Middle English rau, from Old English hrēaw; see kreuə- in Indo-European roots.]

raw′ly adv.
raw′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raw deal - unfair treatment
deal - the type of treatment received (especially as the result of an agreement); "he got a good deal on his car"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

raw deal

noun
An act that is not just:
Law: injury.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a blistering report, the PAC criticised the project, saying customers would get a "raw deal" because ministers had put BT into a "quasimonopolistic position".
Coun Brigid Jones (pictured) said: "Our schools and children are getting a raw deal. If the Government is not going to reimburse us for these academy conversions, then we are going to have to stop doing other things."
"There is a greater level of public awareness and sympathy that people with disabilities have had a raw deal. The public should also know that the nurses who look after people with disabilities have had a raw deal too."
Summary: Serena Williams has won support from the women's tour after she suggested that female players were getting a raw deal at Wimbledon.
I suppose there is a chance that changes will be made as the bill goes through parliament, because the disabled and young mums seem to be getting a raw deal.
"I think big Garry sometimes gets a raw deal, although he still has that challenge to prove himself to everyone in the Premier League," said McLeish.
They fear patients will get a raw deal, being sent to South Wales rather than Liverpool or Manchester, when the new Betsi Cadwalader Local Health Board - combining hospital trusts and LHBs - is set up in October..
The Red Devils boss reckons Celts got a raw deal from critics - led by Blackburn boss Ince who branded United's 3-0 win men against boys.
Just what is happening to our health service when our junior doctors, who represent our tomorrows, get such a raw deal?
I CONCUR with the thoughts of Alan Duncan regarding the fact that bookmakers' staff are getting a raw deal with summer racing, not to mention the prospect of year-round late-night opening.
So, concerning disputes between hirers and owners, hirers usually got a raw deal, already typecast as not being trustworthy in that they did not hold the same level of interest for the owners' slave property.
are getting a raw deal in many popular women's-interest magazines, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.