re-challenge

re-challenge

vb (tr)
to challenge (someone or something) again
References in periodicals archive ?
Mice with complete responses were protected from subcutaneous and intravenous re-challenge of the cancer, revealing that long-term immunological memory was induced by INT230-6.
Imaging three months after re-challenge showed a partial response, or PR, with 75% reduction in total tumor burden.
The patient was not considering re-challenge with dicyclomine with possible risk of pancreatitis recurrence.
Vallorani et al., "Re-challenge studies in non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a systematic review and meta-analysis," Frontiers in Physiology, vol.
Cardiovascular risk being high and having high cholesterol levels, the decision to re-challenge the patient with another statin was made.
Thomas, "Imatinib induced StevensJohnson syndrome: lack of recurrence following re-challenge with a lower dose," Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, vol.
Re-challenge in one patient resulted in re-emergence of erythorcytosis.
If re-challenge with the drug is not appropriate, then a patch test is a feasible means of detection.[sup][26],[27]
In the literature, there is only one case report on hyperacusis that worsened with risperidone in a 5-year-old girl with autism; hyperacusis disappeared after the discontinuation of the medication and re-occurred in a re-challenge test (10).
There were protocols involved in the bouts; no stomping if somebody went down; the end of the fight if an opponent started bleeding or gave up, and if you were defeated you had to wait at least a day to re-challenge. Seldom did adults have to intervene; the fighters usually respected the rules and they generally weren't grudge matches.
Because of the risks associated with hyperkalemia, re-challenge was not performed.