re-choreograph

re-choreograph

vb (tr)
to produce new choreography for (a particular work or piece of music)
References in periodicals archive ?
COLORING WITH STEPS: "I'd always known I wanted to be a choreographer from a young age, and it was confirmed when I would re-choreograph my dance solos on the spot," Kelley recalls.
The word triggers something inside him, blows the dust off fantasies trickling back to adolescence, and slowly begins to re-choreograph his decades of sexual memories.
Think about what you would want to see as an audience member, not how you would re-choreograph the dance.
Claire Benson, of Leamington Spa's Motion House Dane Theatre, agreed: "We've had to re-choreograph our act because of the wind but that's what live street theatre is all about and it makes it all the more dramatic."
But Scary Spice Mel B said her thoughts immediately turned to the tour and how they were going to re-choreograph the dance routines and lyrics.
"We had to re-choreograph our routines because two members had to drop out unexpectedly just before the contest.
One of Angela's teachers, Carole Scanlon, has also been snapped up by the Riverdance team - to re-choreograph part of the show set for Broadway in America.
Considering the ballet lost, New York City Ballet commissioned Lynn Taylor-Corbett to re-choreograph it with the original Kurt Weill music, to premiere this month.