re-emit

re-emit

(ˌriːɪˈmɪt)
vb (tr)
to emit again
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References in periodicals archive ?
NEOWISE's infrared detectors use the light bouncing off Near-Earth objects (NEOs), which absorb most of the light that falls on them and re-emit that energy at infrared wavelengths.
Many astronomical phenomena can be seen in this giant image, including cosmic dust and gas clouds that reflect, absorb, and re-emit the light of hot young stars within the nebula.
It is deemed rare for amphibians like frogs to exhibit fluorescence, the ability for something to absorb light at short wavelengths and re-emit it in a longer period of time.
In an LSC, luminescent species absorb the solar radiation which then re-emit the light at a longer wavelength.
Some dark pigments stay just as cool as white thanks to fluorescence, which occurs when fluorescent materials immediately re-emit absorbed light.
Second, certain sorptive-based IPPT may re-emit captured VOCs upon saturation and subsequently become a source of indoor pollution themselves.
Various fluorophore compounds absorb light of a specific wavelength and re-emit light at longer wavelengths.
These agents absorb light in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum and re-emit light in the blue region, thus increasing the intensity of short-wavelength light, which may be perceived by deer against an otherwise darker background.
In recent years, the research team has discovered that many fishes absorb the remaining blue light and re-emit it in neon greens, reds, and oranges.
This behavior is very similar to that of optical brighteners, which absorb UV light and re-emit it at the blue end of the visible spectrum.
During photosynthesis, plants re-emit some of the light they absorb.
Luminescent animals make their own light, while fluorescent ones absorb and re-emit it.