re-enactor


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Related to re-enactor: reenactment

re-enactor

(ˌriːɪnˈæktə)
n
a person who re-enacts something
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Saturday, said Braese, a longtime re-enactor who lives in Roscoe and works for the city of Elgin's public works department.
Second World War re-enactor Lawrence Cox was among those who revved in for a vintage vehicle show.
Guests then heard from four speakers - Madeleine Campbell Jowett, an active historical re-enactor; Renfrewshire Provost Lorraine Cameron; Melanie Brickley, an artist and member of Soroptimist International of Kirkintilloch; and Maggie Lennon, founder and director of the Bridges Programme, a charity working with refugees, asylum seekers and migrants in Glasgow - who were invited to talk about a woman from history who had personally inspired them.
BY MARTIN FRICKER A MEDIEVAL re-enactor was arrested after brandishing his replica 14th-century sword at yobs outside his home.
York Street businesses will offer Colonial-era fun to visitors with warm drinks and complimentary food, some served by a Colonial era re-enactor.
The Viking re-enactor It was a chance encounter in a cafe that led Steven Banks into the world of re-enacting.
A costumed re-enactor will join you to tell you about the Suffragette movement and answer your questions about women campaigning for the vote 100 years ago.
One of those taking part was 65-year-old Phillip Cadogan, a radiographer from Lindley, a keen re-enactor who has been interested in World War Two since the 1970s.
Living History re-enactor Steve Ottaway in a mock trench which is part of the Passchendaele Remembered experience at Salisbury Cathedral, to mark the centenary of the battle
A keen historical re-enactor, Mr Aston, who's a retired mechanical engineer, took a creative writing course in Dudley.