re-encounter


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re-encounter

(ˌriːɪnˈkaʊntə)
vb (tr)
to encounter again
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Explore the expansive realms, re-encounter the fiery personalities and relive the adventure in fully remastered glory.
ESC aficionados are already looking forward to a re-encounter with Dana International and Verka Serduchka.
The complexity of how students perceive these EDP stages builds as they re-encounter these stages at different moments throughout the book.
Sequences of flybys can be performed, provided that the spacecraft is able to re-encounter the moon.
But upon a chance re-encounter in a club back in Manila, where class boundaries re-emerge, Eric dismisses any memory of knowing his one-time lover/nurse.
They will wade through the many pages of twee juvenilia (the would-be comic ones are the best), gratefully re-encounter 1909's still arresting 'To Stanislaw Wyspianski', wade on through the more ambitious, sub-Heineesque, underwhelming The Earth Child to 1916's plangent elegy for her brother, 'To L.H.B.', and so, with sad relief, to the scatter of more achieved later poems: 'Malade', 'Pic-Nic', 'Dame Seule', the limericked 'Tedious Brief Adventure of K.M.', the adroit 'Men and Women' (with its neat use of the contemporary code word for gay, 'so'), the spooky 'The New Husband', the poignant 'The Wounded Bird'.
NOT having heard the City of Birmingham Choir for some time I was pleasantly surprised to re-encounter such a wonderful homogeneity of tone from all four vocal sections, and the lightness of touch with which this huge corpus delivers (despite some heads firmly ensconced in their scores).
This Year of Mercy is a time for Catholics to re-encounter God's rahmah through our own Scriptures and tradition, but also through the religion of our Muslim brothers and sisters.
Beginning with "His password is the townland he was born in," French works this sixteen line, four stanza piece toward taking the long view of history and a broad view of the world-wide web as somewhere else to re-encounter the human quest.
(23.) Bemoans Clare to Irene in a letter following their chance re-encounter on the rooftop of the Drayton: "'For I am lonely, so lonely [...] you can't know how in this pale life of mine I am all the time seeing the bright pictures of that other one I once thought I was glad to be free of [...] It's like a pain that never ceases,'" ibid., 7.