re-engineer

(redirected from re-engineered)

re-engineer

vb (tr)
to redesign, plan or construct again (as a professional engineer)to restructure or revamp ( a company or part of its operations)
References in periodicals archive ?
With longer battery life, enhanced performance and a superior display, the new Surface Pro has been re-engineered to suit the needs of everyone.
Auto Business News-November 16, 2017--Hyundai to launch eight new and re-engineered CUVs by 2020
Summary: With longer battery life, enhanced performance and a superior display, the new Surface Pro has been re-engineered to suit the needs of everyone.
GMF-Gouda has re-engineered its successful Brush-'n-Belt dry peel remover to improve processing capacity and ease of use, maintenance and cleaning.
According to RIM, the BlackBerry 8700g features a re-engineered device platform that achieves an optimised balance of performance, functionality and design.
A re-engineered ROPS/FOPS enclosure on the two models is the most visible change to these new skid-steers.
With a federal research grant, they re-engineered the program to provide the kind of data they needed to do forest inventories.
They radically re-engineered their development process from a focus on advancing individual technology disciplines, to one focused on meeting today's customer needs, as well as anticipating latent needs 10 to 20 years in the future.
The Maserati Quattroporte is an enhanced and re-engineered throwback to the style of the ]960s, when it was first created.
Grimshaw and Arup were appointed to create a new transit hub with re-engineered platform and underground passenger access.
The enhanced PL-GPC 50 platform with an integrated refractive index detector has been re-engineered to accept additional detectors, including viscometry (PL-BV 400RT) and light scattering (PL-LS), enabling fully integrated triple detection.
In line with today's needs, the Selective Service System's structure, programs and activities should be re-engineered toward maintaining a national inventory of American men and, for the first time, women, ages 18 through 34, with an added focus on identifying individuals with critical skills," stated the February 11, 2003 proposal to the Pentagon, as cited by the paper.