reacquaintance


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reacquaintance

(ˌriːəˈkweɪntəns)
n
formal renewed acquaintance of a person or thing
References in periodicals archive ?
GIN I KNOW it's everywhere, but we had a reacquaintance with a gin we "found" at a food festival many years ago.
was not City it exercise reacquaintance But that would be to unfairly siphon some credit away from Bernardo Silva for his clinical left-footed finish and, even more so, from Aguero for his blink-of-an-eye deadliness.
Henry's reacquaintance with the crabby, creepy people of Castle Rock (including Sissy Spacek as his mother) moves at a dismal pace, each episode seeming twice as long as its actual running time, while the show tries to decide if it's a legal drama or a mystery thriller or something more otherworldly and terrifying.
will be seeking to move beyond reacquaintance, reassurance, and optics to the territory of practical give-and-take.
This office party could've been a reacquaintance party.
A reacquaintance with Nietzsche, more particularly with his concept of a comprehensive will to power, confirmed Heidegger's assumption that a blind power laid at the base of modern thought.
The exhibit 'Homecoming: Works from Dumangas' is a welcome reacquaintance to the work of visual artist Rock Drilon.
Also, the crew of Animal Planet's Finding Bigfoot is filming in the park; however, I understand them as more Eden-getters, pursuing a missing link to a prophecy of our reacquaintance with a world lost.
I drew both tags, so my reacquaintance with western whitetails was going to be a two-part hunt.
WHEN Jurgen Klopp sat before the expectant press for the first time as Liverpool manager, it felt like mere reacquaintance with an old friend, rather than a fresh introduction.
Quoting Arnold's "Dover Beach" on "two worlds, one dead/ The other, powerless to be bom," Cadwallader concludes by emphasizing the theme of "rapid, constant transformation, never settled, always in transition." As the editor indicates, this opening chapter is meant to introduce a number of key issues to those unfamiliar with the Victorian period, and to "reacquaint specialists." It accomplishes the first, but how much and of what nature of "reacquaintance" is achieved is questionable.
"One Way Street," (amzn.to/1mRW163) the historically accurate sequel to that first book, detailed Paul Barrett's own service time in the war, his subsequent reacquaintance to the normal world, and related the horrifying tale of the murderous stalker psychopath who destroyed his young marriage.