readmittance

readmittance

(ˌriːədˈmɪtəns)
n
the act or process of admitting someone or something again
References in periodicals archive ?
However, approximately 5% of patients suffer damage and inflammation to the artery walls, leading to failure of the stent and annual readmittance to hospital.
In the current environment, there is an alignment of Egyptian and Saudi interests in countering Iran and opposing Qatar, but when it comes to solutions for Syria's war and readmittance of Syria into the body, there seems to be disunity.
The work, including ultrasound scans and biopsy services, means patients get the right follow-up care without delays, with fewer needing readmittance to hospital.
It has also been shown that readmittance is significantly reduced by wearable monitoring and testing devices when patients are discharged with them.
His readmittance to the party which his father helped found came after a petition failed to attract the support of 10% of his constituents - the number required to force a new poll.
British foreign minister Boris Johnson met with Zimbabwean counterpart Sibusiso Moyo and ministers from neighbouring African countries during the recent Commonwealth summit in London to discuss Harare's readmittance to the group.
Serious postoperative complications occurred more frequently in the LNE arm (e.g., rate of relaparotomies 12.1% versus 5.9% (p = 0.006), hospital readmittance rate 8.0% versus 3.1% (p = 0.006), and deaths within 60 days after surgery 3.1% versus 0.9% (p = 0.049)).
Despite making numerous calls to the organization after being expelled, Serenity Steps denied her readmittance because, according to Beatrice, they did not feel she was "ready" for drug treatment.
Raouf said that the readmittance rate to hospitals will reduce, putting a lesser burden on healthcare.
(http://www.dexur.com/) Dexur , a platform which analyzes healthcare data, recently looked into opioid abuse hospitalizations and readmittance rates in the United States.
For if the goal of both legal and religious confession is to bring the confessant back into the communal fold, Ford's characters confess their secrets in an unsanctioned forum and without a recognized community that awaits their confession and would authorize their readmittance. (14) Moreover, if one of the traditional aims of religious confession is, as Brooks claims, to provide proof of "inwardness" and a "new sense of selfhood," none of Ford's characters seems to benefit from the experience (Brooks [2000] 2001, 93, 97).