ready money


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ready money

or

ready cash

n
(Banking & Finance) funds for immediate use; cash. Also called: the ready or the readies
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ready money - money in the form of cash that is readily availableready money - money in the form of cash that is readily available; "his wife was always a good source of ready cash"; "he paid cold cash for the TV set"
cash, hard cash, hard currency - money in the form of bills or coins; "there is a desperate shortage of hard cash"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مال نَقداً
hotové peníze
kontant
reiîufé
peşin para

ready

(ˈredi) adjective
1. (negative unready) prepared; able to be used etc immediately or when needed; able to do (something) immediately or when necessary. I've packed our cases, so we're ready to leave; Is tea ready yet?; Your coat has been cleaned and is ready (to be collected).
2. (negative unready) willing. I'm always ready to help.
3. quick. You're too ready to find faults in other people; He always has a ready answer.
4. likely, about (to do something). My head feels as if it's ready to burst.
ˈreadiness noun
ˈreadily adverb
1. willingly. I'd readily help you.
2. without difficulty. I can readily answer all your questions.
ready cash
ready money.
ˌready-ˈmade adjective
(especially of clothes) made in standard sizes, and for sale to anyone who wishes to buy, rather than being made for one particular person. a ready-made suit.
ready money
coins and banknotes. I want to be paid in ready money, not by cheque.
ˌready-to-ˈwear adjective
(of clothes) ready-made.
in readiness
ready. I want everything in readiness for his arrival.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money. "Or at least twenty thousand, Count," he added, "and then a note of hand for only sixty thousand."
Dashwood was upon the whole well satisfied; for though her former style of life rendered many additions to the latter indispensable, yet to add and improve was a delight to her; and she had at this time ready money enough to supply all that was wanted of greater elegance to the apartments.
He had a large capital of debts, which laid out judiciously, will carry a man along for many years, and on which certain men about town contrive to live a hundred times better than even men with ready money can do.
After first exhausting his resources in ready money, Mr.
He seemed always to have ready money, and paid cash for all his purchases at the village stores roundabout, seldom buying more than two or three times at the same place until after the lapse of a considerable time.
"The estate of L500 a-year I have given to you, Mr Jones: and as I know the inconvenience which attends the want of ready money, I have added L1000 in specie.
Sire, there was once upon a time a merchant who possessed great wealth, in land and merchandise, as well as in ready money. He was obliged from time to time to take journeys to arrange his affairs.
Caesar and his father searched, examined, scrutinized, but found nothing, or at least very little; not exceeding a few thousand crowns in plate, and about the same in ready money; but the nephew had time to say to his wife before he expired: `Look well among my uncle's papers; there is a will.'
"It's ridiklous, perfectly ridiklous, Miss Christie; but not bein' in the habit of carryin' ready money, and havin' omitted to cash a draft on Wells, Fargo & Co.--"
Even I myself began to know the want of money (I mean of ready money in my own pocket), and to relieve it by converting some easily spared articles of jewellery into cash.
I address you as a friend; will you accept the gold of the settings in return for a sum of ready money to be placed in my hands?"
And now your father has no ready money to spare, and your mother will have to pay away her ninety-two pounds that she has saved, and she says your savings must go too.