real wages


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real wages

pl n
(Economics) economics wages evaluated with reference to their purchasing power rather than to the money actually paid. Compare money wages

real wages

Wages which are in terms of the goods and services money will buy as distinct from nominal wages which are simply wages in terms of money. If there is an inflation real wages may fall while nominal wages may rise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Real wages are still below pre-crisis levels and the failure of the Tories to boost real wages shows why they cannot be trusted on the economy.
Thanks to this inspiring movement there are now a staggering 5,000 accredited employers across the UK who pay real wages - putting over PS950million back into the pockets of workers.
The equation is clear: For the government's poverty alleviation policies to work, real wages must increase as a result of increased labor productivity.
Bureau of Labor Statistics released its March 2019 update on real wages in the United States on Wednesday, reporting a 0.2 percent drop in real average hourly earnings for production and nonsupervisory employees compared to February and a 1.6 percent increase compared to March 2018.
In the UAE, an inflation rate of 3.2 per cent combined with pay increases of 3.9 per cent means that real wages are expected to increase by 0.7 per cent.
Real wages are hardly highlighted in market reports or studies.
Growth in real wages, therefore, is important to an understanding of the nature of economic growth and its impact on the distribution of income and the living standards of different income groups in the economy.
It showed which local authority areas have suffered the biggest hit to real wages - take home pay once the cost of living has been taken into account - since the 2008 financial crisis.
In the last 20 years, average real wages have almost tripled in emerging and developing G20 countries, while in advanced G20 countries they have increased by just 9 per cent, the report shows.
But hardly noticed is the growing inequality due to the stagnation of real wages while productivity is booming."
Its Counting the Pennies report, published today shows real wages - adjusted for inflation and taken at 2018 values - doubled from [pounds sterling]113 a week in 1945 to [pounds sterling]226 in 1975, and again to [pounds sterling]452 in 2002.
The decline in the wage share in non-tradables contributed in turn to the fall in the wage share in the manufacturing sector, where real wages fell despite a steady increase in labour productivity.