realia


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re·al·i·a

 (rē-ā′lē-ə, -ä′lē-ə)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1. Objects, such as coins, household items, or natural specimens, that are included in a collection primarily composed of documentary materials, as in a library.
2.
a. Objects drawn from real life that are used in classroom instruction.
b. Images or illustrations that represent such objects, especially in a textbook.
3. Real things or facts, especially in contrast to interpretations or idealized representations of them: "a chronicle ... that emphasized whimsical detail rather than social realia" (Catriona Kelly).

[Latin reālia, neuter pl. of reālis, real, actual; see real1.]

realia

(rɪˈeɪlɪə)
pl n
(Education) real-life facts and material used in teaching
[C20: from neuter pl of Late Latin reālis]

realia

objects, as real money, utensils, etc., used by a teacher in the classroom to illustrate aspects of daily life.
See also: Learning
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the scaffolding strategies examined are the use of background knowledge, KWL charts, visual aids, realia, cooperative learning, word wall, story reenactment, and flipped classrooms.
The proceedings of that gathering comprise 13 papers on dress-image as a heuristic problem; form and norm between image and realia; textile and vestimentary sources; source critique between image and written word; dress images and dress orders; gender, fashion, and their visual performance; and signs, symbols, and change of meanings in images.
In Antonova's dictionary many of the realia have definitions in the form of descriptive translations, for example: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 'the lower part of the traditional Kola Saami travel bag' (AHTOHOBA 2014 : 48); [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 'skiing, padded by kamys (koyba)' (AHTOHOBA 2014 : 87).
In terms of the four principles of situated learning put forward by Gonzalez Davies (2004), the use of realia reflects both the communicative approach (forefronting meaning and pragmatics), and social constructivism where learners construct their own knowledge by handling authentic
'Language' meaning that we need to combine a pragmatic and stylistic approach with a socio-cultural and historical approach to texts, and we need the archives of material culture: 'realia', as precious repositories of intellectual attitudes, habits, social discourses, voices, sounds, otherwise irretrievable.
His work neatly balances philological comments--the sources identified are mainly from antiquity (Caesar, Tacitus)--and realia. Particularly detailed information is given on the humanists quoted by Eobanus Hessus in the third act.
20 November 2014 - Spanish real estate operations and development company Hispania Activos Inmobiliarios SAU (BME:HIS) is in final discussions with domestic construction company Fomento de Construcciones y Contratas SA (BME:FCC), or FCC, over the acquisition of its stake in real estate firm Realia Business SA (BME:RLIA), two sources in the know told Reuters Thursday.
From the other hand, realias are not in effective in educational progress of the students and realia whether simple or complex are used as a tool to facilitate teaching/learning process of educational systems.
Using the research tool fondly known here in Israel as "Rav Google," I was able to identify and locate many of the sources quoted and ironically misquoted by Agnon, and I imagine that most native Hebrew readers would have needed similar assistance with these references, as well as with the realia that Agnon mentions.
When teachers use manipulatives (Cuisenaire rods, microscopes) and realia (real-life objects), it reduces the language load for students (Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2008; Johnson, 2010).
In another space, a library volunteer explained "Early Literacy Bags," small backpacks holding picture books and realia on certain topics, such as the ocean or history.