reannex

reannex

(riːˈænɛks)
vb (tr)
formal to annex (something) again
References in classic literature ?
He soon appeared before the city with a corps of ten thousand troops, and finding it a fit occasion, as he had secretly intended from the beginning, to revive an antiquated claim, on the pretext that his ancestors had suffered the place to be dismembered from his territory,[1] he took possession of it in his own name, disarmed, and punished the inhabitants, and reannexed the city to his domains.
When Georgia, believing it could kick Russian peacekeepers out and reannex its seceded province of South Ossetia, attacked in August 2008, the Russian army came crashing in and ran the Georgians out in 48 hours.
With the $15 million it received from the government of the United States as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ending the Mexican-American War, the government of Mexico rearmed and, in 1848-50, attempted to reannex the Yucatan.
Although France wanted to reannex the Belgian provinces, Britain protested.
Anglos also became increasingly alarmed about the loyalties of the Mexican population within their midst, suspecting them of supporting revolutionary extremists who sought to reannex the land lost to the United States in the nineteenth century.
The reaction of the Colonial Office was a surprise to the colonists, for instead of granting a house of assembly, it decided to reannex the colony to Nova Scotia.