rear echelon

rear′ ech′elon


n.
(in a military operation) the troops, officers, etc., removed from the combat zone and responsible for administration.

rear echelon

Elements of a force which are not required in the objective area.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On 1 May 1945, the unit minus a rear echelon embarked on the Army Attack Transport Sea Scamp.
When troop withdrawals became policy, some lessening of new recreational development occurred, but the basic comfort level of the rear echelon remained.
TM&LS new Baserunner 4x4 selectable gas/electric hybrid COMMANDOTM Utility vehicle is built to facilitate missions in forward and rear echelon operational environments.
But the M1903 was still too long and heavy for certain types of troops and as a result, rear echelon personnel, transport drivers, military police, artillery and machine gun crews requiring personal defense weapons were usually issued handguns.
But for the past decade, the US forces in Kuwait have been rear echelon forces supporting the combat forces in Iraq.
Indeed Prevost's lack of suitable military experience for the North American theater of operations and his arrogance led the earl of Loudoun, Major General James Abercromby, and Major General Jeffrey Amherst to consign him to the rear echelon.
The reason for such a disconnect between the televised warriors and the clinical data is the widening rift in fitness standards between the frontline soldier and the rear echelon support element.
He had little use for amenities that tend to grow up around the rear echelon, much to the chagrin of a few of his ISAF colleagues.
It provides a wealth of insights into contemporary and future wars, by focusing on networks--the connection between weapons and systems, the front line and the rear echelon, decision makers and analysts, and domains of warfare from land to sea to air to space to cyberspace.
But stuck in the rear echelon and railbound he was never going to have anything other than plenty of difficulty getting a run.