reasoned


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Related to reasoned: steadying

rea·son

 (rē′zən)
n.
1.
a. The basis or motive for an action, decision, or conviction: There are good reasons to learn a foreign language. See Usage Notes at because, why.
b. A declaration made to explain or justify action, decision, or conviction: What reasons did she give for leaving?
c. A fact or cause that explains why something exists or has occurred: The reason for the building's collapse is unknown.
d. Logic A premise, usually the minor premise, of an argument.
2.
a. The capacity for logical, rational, and analytic thought; intelligence: "Most of us would like to believe that when we say something is right or wrong, we are using our powers of reason alone" (Carl Zimmer).
b. The limit of what is reasonable: "It is a curious thing that, when a man hates or loves beyond reason, he is ready to go beyond reason to gratify his feelings" (Rudyard Kipling).
c. A normal mental state; sanity: He has lost his reason.
v. rea·soned, rea·son·ing, rea·sons
v.tr.
1. To determine or conclude by logical thinking: The doctor reasoned that the patient had a virus.
2. To persuade or dissuade (someone) with reasons: "You boast ... of having reasoned him out of his absurd romance" (William Makepeace Thackeray).
v.intr.
1. To use the faculty of reason; think logically: What would lead you to reason so?
2. To talk or argue logically and persuasively: tried to reason with her son to eat a good breakfast.
3. Obsolete To engage in conversation or discussion.
Idioms:
by reason of
Because of.
in reason
With good sense or justification; reasonably.
within reason
Within the bounds of good sense or practicality.
with reason
With good cause; justifiably.

[Middle English resoun, from Old French raison, from Latin ratiō, ratiōn-, from ratus, past participle of rērī, to consider, think; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

rea′son·er n.
Synonyms: reason, intuition, understanding, judgment
These nouns refer to the intellectual faculty by which humans seek or attain knowledge or truth. Reason is the power to think rationally and logically and to draw inferences: "Mere reason is insufficient to convince us of its [the Christian religion's] veracity" (David Hume).
Intuition is perception or comprehension, as of truths or facts, without the use of the rational process: I trust my intuitions when it comes to assessing someone's character. Understanding is the faculty by which one understands, often together with the resulting comprehension: "The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding" (Louis D. Brandeis).
Judgment is the ability to assess situations or circumstances and draw sound conclusions: "At twenty years of age, the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment" (Benjamin Franklin). See Also Synonyms at cause, think.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reasoned

(ˈriːzənd)
adj
well thought-out or well presented: a reasoned explanation.
ˈreasonedly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.reasoned - logically valid; "a sound argument"
valid - well grounded in logic or truth or having legal force; "a valid inference"; "a valid argument"; "a valid contract"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

reasoned

adjective sensible, clear, logical, systematic, judicious, well-thought-out, well-presented, well-expressed a reasoned approach
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

reasoned

[ˈriːznd] ADJ [argument] → razonado
well-reasonedbien argumentado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

reasoned

[ˈriːzənd] adj [argument] → raisonné(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

reasoned

adj argument, approachdurchdacht; discussionvernunftgeleitet, vernünftig; explanationwohlbegründet, durchdacht; reasoned thoughtVernunftdenken nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

reasoned

[ˈriːznd] adj (discussion, approach) → ragionato/a; (argument, opinion) → ponderato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
From the topmost peak of reason James teaches to cease reasoning and to have faith that all is well and will be well--the old, oh, ancient old, acrobatic flip of the metaphysicians whereby they reasoned reason quite away in order to escape the pessimism consequent upon the grim and honest exercise of reason.
But Marmaduke was too much in the habit of examining both sides of a subject not to perceive the objections, and he reasoned with himself aloud:
Put another way, that some consideration figures as a premise in sound reasoning is not a psychological claim about how anyone has actually reasoned. Rather, it is a claim about how one might reason, and do so soundly.