reasonless


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reasonless

(ˈriːzənlɪs)
adj
without reason
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.reasonless - not marked by the use of reason; "mindless violence"; "reasonless hostility"; "a senseless act"
unreasonable - not reasonable; not showing good judgment
2.reasonless - not endowed with the capacity to reason; "a reasonless brute"
irrational - not consistent with or using reason; "irrational fears"; "irrational animals"
3.reasonless - having no justifying cause or reason; "a senseless, causeless murder"; "a causeless war that never had an aim"; "an apparently arbitrary and reasonless change"
unmotivated - without motivation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
As I write this, all the beings and happenings of that other world rise up before me in vast phantasmagoria, and I know that to you they would be rhymeless and reasonless.
But the time was at hand, rhymeless and reasonless so far as I can see, when I was to begin to pay for my score of years of dallying with John Barleycorn.
He felt toward them a kind of reasonless antipathy that was something more than the physical and spiritual repugnance common to us all.
Of all unbeautiful and inappropriate conceptions this is the most reasonless and offensive.
Suspicious, reasonless. Why should thir Lord Envie them that?
It seemed to her that a moment's respite was allowed, a moment's make-believe, and then again the profound and reasonless law asserted itself, moulding them all to its liking, making and destroying.
Whereas Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno locate such pretensions in Greek religion and literature as well as in Enlightenment secularism and rationalism--the impulse to "establish man as the master of nature" ([1944] 2002)--Woolf suggests that at the heart of ancient tragedy lies an amoral cosmos, in which heroes and heroines suffer reasonless fates.