rebottle

rebottle

(riːˈbɒtəl)
vb (tr)
to bottle (a liquid or substance) again
References in periodicals archive ?
With the cooperation of the surviving partners, New York Times bestselling author Jim Dwyer tells a riveting story of four ambitious and talented young men who tried to rebottle the genie of personal privacy--and paid the price.
If any microbes were found, the winemaker would then rebottle the wine, sometimes more than once.
Nabil Al-Araby had sent several cables for Foreign Ministers of several states encouraging them vote for Palestinian at the UN, said Sabeeh who stressed that the announcement was the perfect rebottle for the continuous Israeli aggression against the Palestinians.
Because of the overlap of issues among economic education, the economics of education and education in general, it is not unusual to see authors rebottle wine with new labels.
For an exploration of the meaning of "closure" and its prevalence in death penalty discourse, see Jody Lynee Madeira, "Why Rebottle the Genie?
Strain and rebottle and use for fruit salads or ice cream, use the liquid as a liqueur.
Compost the used herbs and rebottle the medicinal oil.
In fact, the dictator's manipulation of television was a telling example of how even the most Stalinist of rulers can't rebottle the genie of popular culture once it's been let out--or, more precisely, in.
If they aren't dry, crisp them in a cool oven and rebottle them.
Compare her article, Jody Lynee Madeira, "Why Rebottle the Genie?