rebuilding


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re·build

 (rē-bĭld′)
tr.v. re·built (-bĭlt′), re·build·ing, re·builds
1. To build again.
2. To make extensive structural repairs on.
3. To remodel or make extensive changes in: tried to rebuild society.

rebuilding

(ˌriːˈbɪldɪŋ)
n
1. (Building)
a. the process of building something (such as a city, building, etc) again after it has been damaged or destroyed
b. (as modifier): rebuilding work.
2. the restoration of a system or situation to a previous condition: the rebuilding of the economy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rebuilding - building againrebuilding - building again      
reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again
Translations

rebuilding

[ˈriːˈbɪldɪŋ] Nreconstrucción f

rebuilding

[ˌriːˈbɪldɪŋ]
n
[building, bridge, town] → reconstruction f
(= renewal, restoration) [country, relationship] → reconstruction f; [economy] → reconstruction f
modif [programme, project] → de reconstruction
rebuilding work → travaux mpl de reconstruction

rebuilding

n (= restoration: of house, wall) → Wiederaufbau m; (fig: of society, relationship) → Wiederherstellung f
References in classic literature ?
All was as bare and ugly and uncomfortable as it well could be, for the villages along the river expended so much money in repairing and rebuilding bridges that they were obliged to be very economical in school privileges.
Any one of these partners would have disinherited his son on the question of rebuilding Tellson's.
Fifteen years ago I built my own wood cottage there, and now I'm rebuilding it of good Surrey stone.
I trust so, daughter,'' said Isaac, ``and I trust too in the rebuilding of Zion; but as well do I hope with my own bodily eyes to see the walls and battlements of the new Temple, as to see a Christian, yea, the very best of Christians, repay a debt to a Jew, unless under the awe of the judge and jailor.
The first of these centralizing switchboards was put in place at Philadelphia; and other cities followed suit as fast as they could afford the expense of rebuilding.
It is true, however, that it is not customary to pull down all the houses of a town with the single design of rebuilding them differently, and thereby rendering the streets more handsome; but it often happens that a private individual takes down his own with the view of erecting it anew, and that people are even sometimes constrained to this when their houses are in danger of falling from age, or when the foundations are insecure.
Zephaniah Crypt's Charity, under the stimulus of a late visitation by commissioners, were beginning to apply long- accumulating funds to the rebuilding of the Yellow Coat School, which was henceforth to be carried forward on a greatly-extended scale, the testator having left no restrictions concerning the curriculum, but only concerning the coat.
A few months later the three of them were down at the brook in the Gale Anstey woods to consider the rebuilding of a footbridge carried away by spring floods.
It was built by the Pendragons in the very days of the Spanish wars; and though it's needed patching and even rebuilding for another reason, it's always been rebuilt in the old way.
It would help me a great deal with the Dean and Chapter when I suggest rebuilding your house.
Not long ago some of our young men spent a holiday in rebuilding a cabin for a helpless coloured women who was about seventy-five years old.
Besides this the chief steward wrote every year telling him of fires and bad harvests, or of the necessity of rebuilding factories and workshops.