recalcitrance


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re·cal·ci·trant

 (rĭ-kăl′sĭ-trənt)
adj.
1. Stubbornly resistant to or defiant of authority or guidance. See Synonyms at obstinate.
2. Difficult to manage or deal with: a recalcitrant problem.
3. Resistant to chemical decomposition; decomposing extremely slowly.
n.
A recalcitrant person.

[Late Latin recalcitrāns, recalcitrant-, present participle of recalcitrāre, to be disobedient, from Latin, to deny access : re-, re- + calcitrāre, to kick (from calx, calc-, heel).]

re·cal′ci·trance, re·cal′ci·tran·cy n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recalcitrance - the trait of being unmanageablerecalcitrance - the trait of being unmanageable  
intractability, intractableness - the trait of being hard to influence or control
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recalcitrance

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

recalcitrance

[rɪˈkælsɪtrəns] Nterquedad f, contumacia f (frm)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recalcitrance

[rɪˈkælsɪtrəns] n
(= reluctance)
the government's recalcitrance over introducing even the smallest political reform → la répugnance du gouvernement à introduire ne serait-ce que d'infimes réformes politiques
(= stubbornness) → obstination f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

recalcitrance

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recalcitrance

[rɪˈkælsɪtrns] n (frm) → riluttanza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
He has been detained several times due to accusations of civil disobedience or recalcitrance under military regimes in Nigeria during the 1980s and 1990s, and is still viewed with suspicion or as a threat by Nigerian authorities.
"Ablyazov's recalcitrance is particularly troubling given that the missing evidence goes to the heart of his defenses," Parker said in ruling in Manhattan.
However, the deal has since bogged down over Al Houthis' recalcitrance
But all is not lost, provided that recalcitrance is set aside, and courage and clarity of purpose guide the way.
He further alleged that the Committee in the bid to discharge its constitutional responsibilities in tandem with section 4 of the Legislative Houses (Powers and Privileges) Act had encountered intentional recalcitrance from RMAFC who have delayed the progress of the committee by refusing to honour invitations and requested for information including their condemnable and unlawful official instruction via correspondence to another tier of government not to honour the constitutional requests of a legitimate committee of the National Assembly,
The report also notes Jalisi's recalcitrance as he repeatedly ignored efforts by House Speaker Michael Busch, legislative leaders and the legislature's human resources department to rectify his behavior.
In sections on translating Burkean terms and archival interventions, she considers such topics as metabiology as purification of war, enacting the poetic orientation, caught in the act: A Writer in the Archives, and archival recalcitrance; The Ins and Outs of Communism.
Indeed any attempt by the smaller Provinces to assert themselves is looked upon as recalcitrance. There is no doubt that often such recalcitrance, particularly where it tends to hamper the functioning of the State itself, can cause embarrassment to the country and even harm the interests of the State.
The conference reveals who the pro-Israel community thinks it needs to reachnamely Democrats and progressives, who are increasingly concerned with Israel's human rights record and alleged recalcitrance toward the peace processwhile the more left-wing politicians in attendance often drop subtle but detectable hints as to the organizers' prospects for success.
* A deep suspicion of Utopian promises, rooted in the unfortunate recalcitrance of history
As I finished reading NCR's editorial "We need bishops to stand up to fake news," the recalcitrance of some bishops made me sad.
"EU leaders should accept the Brexit vote is a wake-up call to change and not just an expression of British recalcitrance" - Tony Blair.