recalcitrant


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Related to recalcitrant: obstinately

re·cal·ci·trant

 (rĭ-kăl′sĭ-trənt)
adj.
1. Stubbornly resistant to or defiant of authority or guidance. See Synonyms at obstinate.
2. Difficult to manage or deal with: a recalcitrant problem.
3. Resistant to chemical decomposition; decomposing extremely slowly.
n.
A recalcitrant person.

[Late Latin recalcitrāns, recalcitrant-, present participle of recalcitrāre, to be disobedient, from Latin, to deny access : re-, re- + calcitrāre, to kick (from calx, calc-, heel).]

re·cal′ci·trance, re·cal′ci·tran·cy n.

recalcitrant

(rɪˈkælsɪtrənt)
adj
not susceptible to control or authority; refractory
n
a recalcitrant person
[C19: via French from Latin recalcitrāre, from re- + calcitrāre to kick, from calx heel]
reˈcalcitrance n

re•cal•ci•trant

(rɪˈkæl sɪ trənt)

adj.
1. resisting authority or control; not obedient or compliant: a recalcitrant prisoner.
2. hard to deal with, manage, or operate.
n.
3. a recalcitrant person.
[1835–45; < Latin recalcitrant-, s. of recalcitrāns, present participle of recalcitrāre to kick back]
re•cal′ci•trance, re•cal′ci•tran•cy, n.

recalcitrant

- Comes from Latin recalcitrare, "kick out with the heels," from calx, "heel."
See also related terms for heels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.recalcitrant - stubbornly resistant to authority or control; "a fractious animal that would not submit to the harness"; "a refractory child"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
2.recalcitrant - marked by stubborn resistance to authority; "the University suspended the most recalcitrant demonstrators"
defiant, noncompliant - boldly resisting authority or an opposing force; "brought up to be aggressive and defiant"; "a defiant attitude"

recalcitrant

recalcitrant

adjective
Translations

recalcitrant

[rɪˈkælsɪtrənt] ADJrecalcitrante, contumaz (frm)

recalcitrant

[rɪˈkælsɪtrənt] adj (= stubborn) → récalcitrant(e)

recalcitrant

adjaufsässig

recalcitrant

[rɪˈkælsɪtrnt] adj (frm) → riluttante
References in classic literature ?
As he moved away he saw Lawrence Lefferts, tall and resplendent, leading his wife up to be introduced; and heard Gertrude Lefferts say, as she beamed on the Countess with her large unperceiving smile: "But I think we used to go to dancing-school together when we were children--." Behind her, waiting their turn to name themselves to the Countess, Archer noticed a number of the recalcitrant couples who had declined to meet her at Mrs.
The moment he heard the firing and the cry from behind, the general realized that something dreadful had happened to his regiment, and the thought that he, an exemplary officer of many years' service who had never been to blame, might be held responsible at headquarters for negligence or inefficiency so staggered him that, forgetting the recalcitrant cavalry colonel, his own dignity as a general, and above all quite forgetting the danger and all regard for self-preservation, he clutched the crupper of his saddle and, spurring his horse, galloped to the regiment under a hail of bullets which fell around, but fortunately missed him.
Neither could he mobilize his army to go forth to war, nor could he punish his recalcitrant subjects.
Countless magic details, however, still remained recalcitrant to such treatment; and they evidently troubled Malory, whose devotion to his story was earnest and sincere.
That he had a score of Socialist arguments chasing through his brain in the meantime did not interfere with this; on the contrary, Jurgis scrubbed the spittoons and polished the banisters all the more vehemently because at the same time he was wrestling inwardly with an imaginary recalcitrant. It would be pleasant to record that he swore off drinking immediately, and all the rest of his bad habits with it; but that would hardly be exact.
A recalcitrant metal shaper insisted on peeking from under his lapels, and his ready-made tie with its two grey satin-covered cardboard wings pushed out of sight, see-sawed, necessitating frequent adjustments.
Butteridge plunged into litigation with the more recalcitrant, while at the same time sustaining a vigorous agitation and canvass to induce the Government to purchase his invention.
First converted by the Catholics, he threw down the idols, broke the tabus, cleaned out the native priests, executed a few of the recalcitrant ones, and sent all his subjects to church.
She was looking at him as Claire, in the old days when they had toured England together in road companies, had sometimes seen her look at recalcitrant landladies.
Once he spoke to his son, alluding to the newcomers with a groan: "They will quarrel over the land." "Don't bother about that, father," answered Jean-Pierre, stolidly, and passed, bent double, towing a recalcitrant cow over his shoulder.
Meanwhile Dida Syamsuwida, who was inaugurated as Research Professor in Forest Plant Seed Technology, presented an oration entitled "Innovation in Handling Forest Recalcitrant Seed Technology
In the retrospective, nonrandomized study, 15 women and 6 men with erosive, recalcitrant oral lichen planus were treated with hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) at a dose of 200 mg/day, which was increased to 400 mg/day at 1 month.