recalcitrant

(redirected from recalcitrantly)
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re·cal·ci·trant

 (rĭ-kăl′sĭ-trənt)
adj.
1. Stubbornly resistant to or defiant of authority or guidance. See Synonyms at obstinate.
2. Difficult to manage or deal with: a recalcitrant problem.
3. Resistant to chemical decomposition; decomposing extremely slowly.
n.
A recalcitrant person.

[Late Latin recalcitrāns, recalcitrant-, present participle of recalcitrāre, to be disobedient, from Latin, to deny access : re-, re- + calcitrāre, to kick (from calx, calc-, heel).]

re·cal′ci·trance, re·cal′ci·tran·cy n.

recalcitrant

(rɪˈkælsɪtrənt)
adj
not susceptible to control or authority; refractory
n
a recalcitrant person
[C19: via French from Latin recalcitrāre, from re- + calcitrāre to kick, from calx heel]
reˈcalcitrance n

re•cal•ci•trant

(rɪˈkæl sɪ trənt)

adj.
1. resisting authority or control; not obedient or compliant: a recalcitrant prisoner.
2. hard to deal with, manage, or operate.
n.
3. a recalcitrant person.
[1835–45; < Latin recalcitrant-, s. of recalcitrāns, present participle of recalcitrāre to kick back]
re•cal′ci•trance, re•cal′ci•tran•cy, n.

recalcitrant

- Comes from Latin recalcitrare, "kick out with the heels," from calx, "heel."
See also related terms for heels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.recalcitrant - stubbornly resistant to authority or control; "a fractious animal that would not submit to the harness"; "a refractory child"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
2.recalcitrant - marked by stubborn resistance to authority; "the University suspended the most recalcitrant demonstrators"
defiant, noncompliant - boldly resisting authority or an opposing force; "brought up to be aggressive and defiant"; "a defiant attitude"

recalcitrant

recalcitrant

adjective
Translations

recalcitrant

[rɪˈkælsɪtrənt] ADJrecalcitrante, contumaz (frm)

recalcitrant

[rɪˈkælsɪtrənt] adj (= stubborn) → récalcitrant(e)

recalcitrant

adjaufsässig

recalcitrant

[rɪˈkælsɪtrnt] adj (frm) → riluttante
References in periodicals archive ?
It is hard to imagine this despoiled but recalcitrantly enduring earth without hearing Spivak's admonishment that "even a devastated planet lives a billion [years], without us." (56) Wollstonecraft's text evinces angst, doubt, and impotence, but it also offers a template for a different way of being in the world and with the world.
The Saudi-led coalition said it had permitted an Al Houthi plane to take off from the militia-held capital Sana'a, but Al Houthis reacted "recalcitrantly".
Now, the closer you get, the more recalcitrantly and materially present things and people seem--they might become less recognizable, but they don't evaporate.
In this context, both wage labour and 'improved' commercial agricultural practices emerged as two of the foremost ways in which such economic tutelage could be exercised over a 'native' population that both administrators and settlers initially believed to be recalcitrantly inclined toward subsistence livelihoods (Berman and Lonsdale, 1980: 63).
(337) Second, Congress had been recalcitrantly trying to impose on newly admitted states conditions that are inconsistent with the equal sovereignty principle since long before the Civil War.