recension


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re·cen·sion

 (rĭ-sĕn′shən)
n.
1. A critical revision of a text incorporating the most plausible elements found in varying sources.
2. A text so revised.

[Latin recēnsiō, recēnsiōn-, a reviewing, from recēnsēre, to review : re-, re- + cēnsēre, to estimate; see kens- in Indo-European roots.]

recension

(rɪˈsɛnʃən)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a critical revision of a literary work
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a text revised in this way
[C17: from Latin recēnsiō, from recēnsēre to survey, from re- + cēnsēre to assess]

re•cen•sion

(rɪˈsɛn ʃən)

n.
a critical revision of a text, esp. one based on examination of its sources.
[1810–20; < Latin recēnsiō revision of the censor's roll =re- re- + cēnsēre to estimate, assess]
re•cen′sion•ist, n.
Translations

recension

[rɪˈsenʃən] Nrecensión f

recension

nRezension f
References in classic literature ?
It is probable that this and other superfluous incidents disappeared after the Alexandrian arrangement of the poems in the Cycle, either as the result of some later recension, or merely through disuse.
He suspected the Archdeacon of not having read them; he was in painful doubt as to what was really thought of them by the leading minds of Brasenose, and bitterly convinced that his old acquaintance Carp had been the writer of that depreciatory recension which was kept locked in a small drawer of Mr.
The committee also approved the recension budget for the year 2018-19.
(3578-84) The earliest and fullest version of this moving performance over a hero's torn body is found in the Book of Leinster version (known as Recension II) of the Tain Bo Cualnge (Cattle Raid of Cooley), medieval Ireland's most important heroic saga.
Concerning the material of the first millennium BCE, Farber distinguishes between the "pirsu recension" (Nineveh and Sultantepe) and the "tuppu recension" (Assur and Babylonia), named after the colophons of the two recensions, of which he offers a schematic juxtaposition (p.
He discusses the Arian controversy and the "authentic" letters of Ignatius; God language in the Ignatian long recension: a christological profile; the Ignatian long recension in fourth-century christological context; Eusebius of Caesarea, Athanasius of Alexandria, and Ignatius of Antioch; and John Chrysostom: in defense of Ignatius.
The most detailed chronicle account of Eleanor's downfall is found within the recension in Trinity College, Cambridge, MS O.91.
Aunque no es usual que el autor de un capitulo escriba la recension del libro, la licencia se justifica en este caso por tratarse de un texto de no facil acceso.