recession


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re·ces·sion 1

 (rĭ-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The fact or action of moving away or back, especially:
a. The erosion of a cliff or headland from a given point, as from the action of a waterfall.
b. The reduction of a glacier from a point of advancement.
c. The motion of celestial objects away from one another in an expanding universe.
2. A significant period of economic decline from the peak to the trough of a business cycle, characterized by decreasing aggregate output and often by rising unemployment.
3. The withdrawal in a line or file of participants in a ceremony, especially clerics and choir members after a church service.

[Latin recessiō, recessiōn-, from recessus, past participle of recēdere, to recede; see recede1.]

re·ces′sion·ar′y adj.

re·ces·sion 2

 (rē-sĕsh′ən)
n. Law
The restoration of property by a grantee back to the previous owner by means of a legal conveyance.

recession

(rɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. (Economics) a temporary depression in economic activity or prosperity
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the withdrawal of the clergy and choir in procession from the chancel at the conclusion of a church service
3. the act of receding
4. (Building) a part of a building, wall, etc, that recedes
[C17: from Latin recessio; see recess]

recession

(riːˈsɛʃən)
n
the act of restoring possession to a former owner
[C19: from re- + cession]

re•ces•sion

(rɪˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. a period of economic decline when production, employment, and earnings fall below normal levels.
2. the act of receding or withdrawing.
3. a receding part of a wall, building, etc.
4. a withdrawing procession, as at the end of a religious service.
[1640–50; < Latin recessiō. See recess, -tion]
re•ces′sion•ar′y, adj.

Recession

 of economists—Lipton, 1970.

recession

A temporary decline in economic activity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recession - the state of the economy declinesrecession - the state of the economy declines; a widespread decline in the GDP and employment and trade lasting from six months to a year
economic condition - the condition of the economy
2.recession - a small concavity
pharyngeal recess - a small recess in the wall of the pharynx
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
3.recession - the withdrawal of the clergy and choir from the chancel to the vestry at the end of a church service
procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
4.recession - the act of ceding back
ceding, cession - the act of ceding
5.recession - the act of becoming more distant
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"

recession

noun depression, drop, decline, slump, downturn, slowdown, trough The recession caused sales to drop off.
boom, upturn
Quotations
"It's a recession when your neighbour loses his job; it's a depression when you lose yours" [Harry S. Truman]

recession

noun
A period of decreased business activity and high unemployment:
Translations
تَراجُع، إنْحِسارركود
hospodářský poklesrecese
lavkonjunkturrecession
lamalamakausilaskusuhdannetaantuma
recesija
gazdasági pangásrecesszió
efnahagsleg lægî, samdráttur
不況景気後退衰退退去
불경기
nuosmukis
lejupslīde
hospodársky pokles
lågkonjunktur
การตกต่ำทางเศรษฐกิจ
tình trạng suy thoái

recession

[rɪˈseʃən] N
1. (Econ) → recesión f
to be in recessionestar en recesión or retroceso
2. (frm) (= receding) → retroceso m

recession

[rɪˈsɛʃən] n (ECONOMICS)récession f
to go into recession → entrer en récession
to be in recession → être en récession

recession

n
no pl (receding) → Zurückweichen f, → Rückgang m; (Eccl) → Auszug m
(Econ) → Rezession f, → (wirtschaftlicher) Rückgang

recession

[rɪˈsɛʃn] n (Econ) → recessione f

recession

(rəˈseʃən) noun
a temporary fall in a country's or the world's business activities.

recession

ركود recese lavkonjunktur Rezession ύφεση recesión lamakausi récession recesija recessione 景気後退 불경기 recessie tilbakegang recesja recessão спад lågkonjunktur การตกต่ำทางเศรษฐกิจ durgunluk tình trạng suy thoái 衰退

re·ces·sion

n. recesión, retirada, retroceso patológico de tejidos tal como la retracción de la encía.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contents Introduction The Length and Depth of Recessions Unemployment in Recessions Consumption and Investment in Recessions Recessions and Oil Prices Recessions and the World Economy Recessions and the Financial Sector Comparisons Between the Recent Recession and the Great Depression Tables Table 1.
A global recession such as the Great Recession is often wide-spread, dampening economic growth across most regions and sectors of the United States.
economy is thriving, some states can be in recession, and vice versa.
Recently in this journal, Eisenbeis and Kautman (Atlantic Economic Journal, 2016) referred to the double-dip recession that began in 1980 and ended in the fourth quarter of 1982 While it is rather common to consider the macroeconomic experience of the United States during the early 1980s as a double-dip recession, that is not the characterization offered by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).
Terrones present readers with a examination of the economics surrounding the cycle of global recession and recovery.
Talk of an impending recession has blown up since the start of the year - largely thanks to the abysmal performance of the stock markets.
This summer marked the six-year anniversary of the end of the Great Recession, one of the longest economic recessions, and possibly the worst, since the Great Depression.
Raise your hand if you think the United States will never have another recession.
The Great Recession and the Contradictions of Contemporary Capitalism
The economic effects of the profound recession that struck the United States from December 2007 through June 2009 (aptly dubbed the "Great Recession") are well known: falling employment, rising unemployment, less consumer spending, and a host of other contractionary consequences, as in other U.
THE Government warns us that another recession may be imminent.
These effects, sometimes labeled "hysteresis," could arise because a recession reduces capital accumulation, scars workers who lose their jobs, and disrupts the economic activities that produce technological progress.