recidivism


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re·cid·i·vism

 (rĭ-sĭd′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The repeating of or returning to criminal behavior by the same offender or type of offender.

[From recidivist, one who recidivates, from French récidiviste, from récidiver, to relapse, from Medieval Latin recidīvāre, from Latin recidīvus, falling back, from recidere, to fall back : re-, re- + cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

re·cid′i·vist n.
re·cid′i·vis′tic, re·cid′i·vous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recidivism

(rɪˈsɪdɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Law) habitual relapse into crime
[C19: from Latin recidīvus falling back, from re- + cadere to fall]
reˈcidivist n, adj
reˌcidiˈvistic, reˈcidivous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•cid•i•vism

(rɪˈsɪd əˌvɪz əm)

n.
repeated or habitual relapse, as into crime.
[1885–90; < Latin recidīv(us) relapsing (recid(ere) to fall back)]
re•cid′i•vist, n., adj.
re•cid`i•vis′tic, re•cid′i•vous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

recidivism

a repeated relapsing into criminal or delinquent behavior. — recidivist, n. — recidivistic, recidivous, adj.
See also: Crime
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recidivism - habitual relapse into crime
lapsing, relapse, relapsing, backsliding, reverting, lapse, reversion - a failure to maintain a higher state
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recidivism

noun
A slipping from a higher or better condition to a lower or poorer one:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

recidivism

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪzəm] Nreincidencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recidivism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recidivism

[rɪˈsɪdɪˌvɪzm] nrecidività
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity
n. recidiva, reincidencia, tendencia a recaer en una condición, enfermedad o síntoma previo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
OKLAHOMA CITY Legislation that attempts to improve Oklahoma's recidivism rate passed on the House floor Tuesday with a bipartisan vote of 85 to 6.
Patrick Kenneally, McHenry County State's Attorney, who has been involved with this project from the beginning, stated, "This is a wonderful example of how prosecutors, judges, and defense attorneys can work together to create a program that will reduce the costs of the criminal justice and prison systems, reduce DUI recidivism and make our roads safer, and help members of our community recover from alcohol and drug abuse."
(2) It is important to consider how many of these MDOs will reencounter the criminal justice system because of recurrent offences, otherwise known as: recidivism. 'A recidivist is one who after release from custody for having committed a crime [...] falls back, or relapses into former behaviour patterns and commits additional crimes'.
Because he had at least two prior felony drug convictions in New Mexico, he was subject to the recidivism provisions of 21 U.S.C.
Rollins has persistently pushed forward a criminal justice reformation program that primarily focuses on the reduction of "recidivism rates," which refer to the criminals' tendency to repeat offenses.
In Iowa and elsewhere, lower recidivism rates may be found among female offenders and people over age 55.
Participation in mental health courts appears to reduce some measures of recidivism among adults with mental illness - but the impact is modest, according to a meta-analysis conducted by Evan M.
The Peterborough SIB funded One Service, an umbrella organization designed to respond to the complex needs of offenders to help them break the cycle of recidivism. Over five years of operation, One Service offered postrelease support for a period of up to 12 months to two cohorts of 1,000 male prisoners who had served short sentences.
A positive impact on women's recidivism could be made by making more educational opportunities available to women in prison.
Time Served Has a U-Shaped Association with Recidivism