recidivist


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re·cid·i·vism

 (rĭ-sĭd′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The repeating of or returning to criminal behavior by the same offender or type of offender.

[From recidivist, one who recidivates, from French récidiviste, from récidiver, to relapse, from Medieval Latin recidīvāre, from Latin recidīvus, falling back, from recidere, to fall back : re-, re- + cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

re·cid′i·vist n.
re·cid′i·vis′tic, re·cid′i·vous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recidivist

A person who has committed crimes in the past and shows a tendency to relapse into crime at a later date.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recidivist - someone who is repeatedly arrested for criminal behavior (especially for the same criminal behavior)
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
2.recidivist - someone who lapses into previous undesirable patterns of behaviorrecidivist - someone who lapses into previous undesirable patterns of behavior
offender, wrongdoer - a person who transgresses moral or civil law
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
recidivista

recidivist

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪst] Nreincidente mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recidivist

nRückfällige(r) mf
adjrückfällig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recidivist

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪst] nrecidivo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
About twenty years earlier, she was convicted of a felony drug offense in California, and therefore, the government sought to impose a ten-year mandatory minimum term of imprisonment pursuant to a recidivist enhancement provision, 21 U.S.C.
18 paragraph I) of the Disciplinary Regulations of Conmebol, considering the seriousness of the conducts and the recidivist character of the organising club of the event.
'A recidivist is one who after release from custody for having committed a crime [...] falls back, or relapses into former behaviour patterns and commits additional crimes'.
Punitive societies like the USA and UK have recidivist rates between 50-60% while less punitive nations rates are up to 50% lower.
I declare to the 'President'; Nigerian youth are not the problem of our country, dishonest, recidivist geriatric rulers are our Achilles heel.
TO ensure that funds allocated for the government's free college tuition program won't be wasted on malingerers and recidivist absentees or bulakbol students, a lawmaker on Tuesday said Congress will activate its congressional oversight powers to monitor the implementation of free college education law.
A person shall be considered a recidivist: (1) if the person has been convicted of a crime with a final judgment and then he relapses into another crime; or (2) Any person against whom a final judgment was previously issued for an offence of forgery, theft, breach of trust, receiving stolen goods or items or proceeds resulting from an offence, or commencement of any such offence he perpetrated, then subsequently perpetrated within five years from the judgment one of the said offences or attempted any of them.
Zeroing in on firms' hiring and monitoring of high-risk and recidivist brokers, including whether firms establish appropriate supervisory and compliance controls for them, was included among the self-regulator's top exam priorities for 2017.
A few scholars have explored offenders' explicit and implicit attitudes toward aggression (Suter, Pihet, de Ridder, Zimmermann, & Stephan, 2014), but little is empirically known regarding aggression differences among nonoffenders, onset-offenders, and recidivists. We, therefore, aimed to investigate differences in aggression between nonoffender, onset-offender, and recidivist migrant youth in China, using both explicit and implicit measures.
"He is a classic recidivist and may well be becoming institutionalised," he said.