recidivism

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re·cid·i·vism

 (rĭ-sĭd′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The repeating of or returning to criminal behavior by the same offender or type of offender.

[From recidivist, one who recidivates, from French récidiviste, from récidiver, to relapse, from Medieval Latin recidīvāre, from Latin recidīvus, falling back, from recidere, to fall back : re-, re- + cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

re·cid′i·vist n.
re·cid′i·vis′tic, re·cid′i·vous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recidivism

(rɪˈsɪdɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Law) habitual relapse into crime
[C19: from Latin recidīvus falling back, from re- + cadere to fall]
reˈcidivist n, adj
reˌcidiˈvistic, reˈcidivous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•cid•i•vism

(rɪˈsɪd əˌvɪz əm)

n.
repeated or habitual relapse, as into crime.
[1885–90; < Latin recidīv(us) relapsing (recid(ere) to fall back)]
re•cid′i•vist, n., adj.
re•cid`i•vis′tic, re•cid′i•vous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

recidivism

a repeated relapsing into criminal or delinquent behavior. — recidivist, n. — recidivistic, recidivous, adj.
See also: Crime
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recidivism - habitual relapse into crime
lapsing, relapse, relapsing, backsliding, reverting, lapse, reversion - a failure to maintain a higher state
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recidivism

noun
A slipping from a higher or better condition to a lower or poorer one:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

recidivism

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪzəm] Nreincidencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recidivism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recidivism

[rɪˈsɪdɪˌvɪzm] nrecidività
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity
n. recidiva, reincidencia, tendencia a recaer en una condición, enfermedad o síntoma previo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Alliances based on recidivistic nationalism can only undermine the war on Al-Shabaab and Somalia's recovery.
A correctional facility's utilization of group-centered therapies is cost effective and helps inmates to build connections with prosocial groups, reducing recidivistic behaviors (Miller, Wakefield, and Soni, 2016).
This will be accomplished by prudent investment--particularly recidivistic or dangerous defendants represent poor investments and will not be bailed--and potentially through the provision of resources to defendants that are bailed.
Other key findings of interest among inpatient psychiatric juvenile fire setters indicated a significant, dyadic relationship between animal cruelty and fire setting; juveniles who engaged in acts of animal cruelty were more likely to engage in recidivistic fire setting, in contrast to their counterparts who did not engage in such acts (Kuhnley et al., 1982; Slavkin, 2001).
"While the world's largest retailer has an unending supply of time and money to engage in such obstructive tactics, the unwitting casualties of Walmart's recidivistic abuse are both the Court and the prevailing party to the unanimous jury verdict, Cuker Interactive."
Similarly, Judd (2002) examined traumatic injuries among rural and urban Nubians and found a greater prevalence of accidental recidivistic injuries in the rural population.
Management of cholesteatoma requires prolonged, diligent postoperative follow-up due to the significant rate of recidivistic disease.
Childhood cholesteatoma has an aggressive nature and has a high rate of recidivistic disease, hence the need for diligent long term follow up.