reciprocal pronoun


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Related to reciprocal pronoun: indefinite pronoun, demonstrative pronoun, subject case

reciprocal pronoun

Reciprocal pronouns are used to refer to two or more people who are or were the subject of the same verb, with both or all parties mutually receiving or benefiting from that action in the same way. Reciprocal pronouns always function as the objects of verbs, referring back to the two or more people who are or were the subject(s).
The two reciprocal pronouns in English are each other and one another.
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reciprocal pronoun

n.
A pronoun or pronominal phrase, such as each other, that expresses mutual action or relationship.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reciprocal pronoun - a pronoun or pronominal phrase (as `each other') that expresses a mutual action or relationship between the individuals indicated in the plural subject; "The sentence `They cared for each other' contains a reciprocal pronoun"
pronoun - a function word that is used in place of a noun or noun phrase
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Russi describes the controversial status of gli, 3rd plural indirect object pronoun that often replaces the nonclitic form loro, and the variety of functions of the clitic si, which are categorized as pronominal (3rd singular reflexive and reciprocal pronoun and impersonal si) and nonpronominal (passive marker, ergative, marker of inherently reflexive verbs without a nonreflexive counterpart, and aspectual/completive si with verbs of physical and psychological consumption).
In (13a) Standard English will prefer the reciprocal pronoun each other and in (13b) either of each other or one another is considered appropriate.
Further evidence for this cline is that corpus examples in which collective nouns are accompanied by the reciprocal pronoun elkaar ('each other'), by the prepositions tussen ('between') or onder ('among'), or by the adverb/adjective onderling ('mutual, between themselves'), only include type 2 and type 3 nouns.
Then, the pronoun sich in (33) is not a reflexive pronoun in the strict sense, but a reciprocal pronoun meaning `each other'.
These deictic words fall under the following classification of pronouns: personal pronouns, possessive pronouns, reflexive pronouns, emphatic pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, indefinite pronouns, reciprocal pronouns, interrogative pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns.
The reciprocal anaphors or quantifiers seem to have no other use in many languages, whereas polysemy is the standard situation for reciprocal affixes and reciprocal pronouns. The most wide-spread of these recurrent meanings were listed above.
Present-day English has two reciprocal pronouns, one another and each other.