recluse

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rec·luse

 (rĕk′lo͞os′, rĭ-klo͞os′)
n.
A person who withdraws from the world to live in seclusion and often in solitude.
adj. re·cluse (rĭ-klo͞os′, rĕk′lo͞os′)
Withdrawn from the world; reclusive.

[Middle English, from Old French reclus, from Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere, to shut up : re-, re- + claudere, to close.]

recluse

(rɪˈkluːs)
n
1. a person who lives in seclusion
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who lives in solitude to devote himself to prayer and religious meditation; a hermit, anchorite, or anchoress
adj
solitary; retiring
[C13: from Old French reclus, from Late Latin reclūdere to shut away, from Latin re- + claudere to close]
reclusion n
reˈclusive adj

rec•luse

(ˈrɛk lus, rɪˈklus)

n.
1. a person who lives in seclusion or apart from society.
adj. re•cluse
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French reclus < Late Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere to shut in, lock up]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recluse - one who lives in solituderecluse - one who lives in solitude    
lone hand, lone wolf, loner - a person who avoids the company or assistance of others
Adj.1.recluse - withdrawn from society; seeking solitude; "lived an unsocial reclusive life"
unsocial - not seeking or given to association; being or living without companions; "the unsocial disposition to neglect one's neighbors"

recluse

noun hermit, solitary, ascetic, anchoress, monk, anchorite, eremite His widow became a virtual recluse for the remainder of her life.

recluse

adjective
Solitary and shut off from society:
Translations
مُنْعَزِل عن النّاس، ناسِك
-kasmolař
eneboer
einsetumaîur
vientuļnieks
samotár

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] Nsolitario/a m/f

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nreclus(e) m/f, ermite m

recluse

nEinsiedler(in) m(f)

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nrecluso/a, eremita m

recluse

(rəˈkluːs) noun
a person who lives alone and avoids other people.
References in classic literature ?
In a by-yard, there was a wilderness of empty casks, which had a certain sour remembrance of better days lingering about them; but it was too sour to be accepted as a sample of the beer that was gone - and in this respect I remember those recluses as being like most others.
To stop the clock of busy existence at the hour when we were personally sequestered from it, to suppose mankind stricken motionless when we were brought to a stand-still, to be unable to measure the changes beyond our view by any larger standard than the shrunken one of our own uniform and contracted existence, is the infirmity of many invalids, and the mental unhealthiness of almost all recluses.
Occasionally the air breathed through the crevices of the hut, and the low flame that fluttered about the embers of the fire threw their wavering light on the person of the sullen recluse.
Not with such fervor prays the torpid recluse, looking forward to the cold, sunless, stagnant calm of a day that is to be like innumerable yesterdays.
But through the remainder of Hester's life there were indications that the recluse of the scarlet letter was the object of love and interest with some inhabitant of another land.
There was a great deal of joking about the unpopular young recluse who, as the cook said, "had found his master, and good for him.
He said, "it was altogether impossible to find such a solitary island as I desired to live in; but I might command in my own house, and pass my time in a manner as recluse as I pleased.
He went to call indeed; but he was perhaps relieved to be denied admittance; perhaps, in his heart, he preferred to speak with Poole upon the doorstep and surrounded by the air and sounds of the open city, rather than to be admitted into that house of voluntary bondage, and to sit and speak with its inscrutable recluse.
I must not remain forever a recluse, for similar chances have come my way before.
But a grumpy recluse cannot worry his subordinates: whereas the man in whom the sense of duty is strong (or, perhaps, only the sense of self-importance), and who persists in airing on deck his moroseness all day - and perhaps half the night - becomes a grievous infliction.
We walked in, and Frances rose from her seat near the table to receive us; her mourning attire gave her a recluse, rather conventual, but withal very distinguished look; its grave simplicity added nothing to beauty, but much to dignity; the finish of the white collar and manchettes sufficed for a relief to the merino gown of solemn black; ornament was forsworn.
A few friends felt at liberty to visit the recluse, and were kindly welcomed, but he himself sought no one.