recluse

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rec·luse

 (rĕk′lo͞os′, rĭ-klo͞os′)
n.
A person who withdraws from the world to live in seclusion and often in solitude.
adj. re·cluse (rĭ-klo͞os′, rĕk′lo͞os′)
Withdrawn from the world; reclusive.

[Middle English, from Old French reclus, from Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere, to shut up : re-, re- + claudere, to close.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recluse

(rɪˈkluːs)
n
1. a person who lives in seclusion
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who lives in solitude to devote himself to prayer and religious meditation; a hermit, anchorite, or anchoress
adj
solitary; retiring
[C13: from Old French reclus, from Late Latin reclūdere to shut away, from Latin re- + claudere to close]
reclusion n
reˈclusive adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rec•luse

(ˈrɛk lus, rɪˈklus)

n.
1. a person who lives in seclusion or apart from society.
adj. re•cluse
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French reclus < Late Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere to shut in, lock up]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recluse - one who lives in solituderecluse - one who lives in solitude    
lone hand, lone wolf, loner - a person who avoids the company or assistance of others
Adj.1.recluse - withdrawn from society; seeking solitude; "lived an unsocial reclusive life"
unsocial - not seeking or given to association; being or living without companions; "the unsocial disposition to neglect one's neighbors"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recluse

noun hermit, solitary, ascetic, anchoress, monk, anchorite, eremite His widow became a virtual recluse for the remainder of her life.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

recluse

adjective
Solitary and shut off from society:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُنْعَزِل عن النّاس، ناسِك
-kasmolař
eneboer
einsetumaîur
vientuļnieks
samotár

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] Nsolitario/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nreclus(e) m/f, ermite m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

recluse

nEinsiedler(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nrecluso/a, eremita m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

recluse

(rəˈkluːs) noun
a person who lives alone and avoids other people.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
David: we could no doubt find some men of the Covenant who would swear to your reclusion; but once they were in the box, we could no longer check their testimony, and some word of your friend Mr.
Michaelis pursued his idea - THE idea of his solitary reclusion - the thought vouchsafed to his captivity and growing like a faith revealed in visions.