recombinant DNA


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Related to recombinant DNA: recombinant DNA technology

recombinant DNA

n. Abbr. rDNA
Genetically engineered DNA prepared by transplanting or splicing genes from one species into the cells of a host organism of a different species. Such DNA becomes part of the host's genetic makeup and is replicated.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recombinant DNA

n
(Genetics) genetics DNA molecules that are extracted from different sources and chemically joined together; for example DNA comprising an animal gene may be recombined with DNA from a bacterium
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

recombinant DNA


n.
DNA in which one or more segments or genes have been inserted, either naturally or by laboratory manipulation, from a different molecule or from another part of the same molecule, resulting in a new genetic combination.
[1970–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·com·bi·nant DNA

(rē-kŏm′bə-nənt)
A form of DNA produced by combining genetic material from two different sources by means of genetic engineering. Recombinant DNA can be used to change the genetic makeup of a cell, as in adding a gene to make a bacterial cell produce insulin.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recombinant DNA

a DNA molecule in which the genetic material has been artificially broken down so that genes from another organism can be intro-duced and the molecule then recombined, the result being alterations in the genetic characteristics of the original molecule.
See also: Heredity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recombinant DNA - genetically engineered DNA made by recombining fragments of DNA from different organisms
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ADN recombiné
References in periodicals archive ?
In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was mere imagination that desirable characteristics can be ameliorated in the living bodies through controlling expressions of target genes.
Mr Akhtar noted that the advancements in the recombinant DNA technology and the large variety of protein engineering methods supported by modern screening techniques had allowed unlimited possibilities of improving proteins and enzymes for applications.
Editas Medicine announced the National Institutes of Health Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee completed the NIH protocol registration process for EDIT-101.
The vice-chancellor briefed the delegation about the UVAS academic, research, extension services, recombinant DNA technology, microbiology research equipment and facilities for small and large animals, national and international collaborations, etc.
- The global recombinant DNA technology market is expected to reach USD 844.6bn by 2025, according to a new report by US-based market research and consulting company Grand View Research, Inc.
Therefore, this special issue was organized, comprising eleven original research papers and three reviews aimed to highlight recent advances in (1) comparative genomics for plant breeding, (2) transcriptome analysis for plant breeding, (3) genotyping and marker-assisted breeding, and (4) recombinant DNA technology (Figure 1).
1971-73: Development of recombinant DNA allows researchers to cut and paste genes in bacteria.
But perhaps the quintessential example of this phenomenon was the origin in the early 1970s of recombinant DNA technology (also known as 'genetic modification,' or 'GM'), the prototypic technique of modern genetic engineering, which resulted from synergy among several esoteric, largely unrelated areas of basic research.
Many of those currently opposed to germline gene therapy wax nostalgic about a historic 1975 meeting of scientists, ethicists, and members of the press held in Asilomar, California, which resulted in a temporary moratorium on recombinant DNA, or gene-splicing, research; and, ultimately, in the creation of highly restrictive, unnecessary regulation.
Recombinant DNA technology has revolutionized biomedical research, laboratory medicine, and pharmaceutics over the last several decades.
Their topics include: to the cell and beyond, the realm of molecular genetics, nucleic acids, principles and applications of recombinant DNA, the physical structure of the genomic material, transcription in eukaryotes, the regulation of transcription in bacteria, RNA processing, the players and process of translation, protein processing and modification, DNA replication in bacteria and eukaryotes, and DNA repair.

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