reconceive

reconceive

(ˌriːkənˈsiːv)
vb (tr)
formal to conceive (an idea, creative or literary conception, etc) again
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
19-24, a raw, funny dance theater work unpacking the performers' experiences of life with cerebral palsy; and Trisha Brown: In Plain Site, in which members of Brown's eponymous troupe reconceive her works for outdoor spaces.
In particular, eco-deconstruction calls us to reconceive not only presence and time but also the relationship between life and death, and the living being to its exteriority and the ways in which living beings appropriate and "exappropriate" (Toadvine's term) their environments.
For its next wave of transformation, Credit Mutuel will combine multiple technologies from IBM - IBM Cloud, Security, and Watson - to reconceive partner relationships and operations and to help guarantee data security and protection of customer information.
For its next wave of transformation, Credit Mutuel will combine multiple technologies from IBM -- IBM Cloud, Security, and Watson -- to reconceive partner relationships and operations.
Several years ago, during a meeting in a Paris cafe, Gregory Castera and Sandra Terdjman asked me how being deaf offered different ways of hearing sound, and how sound's absence creates an invitation to reconceive the sonic field.
Another way is for insurers to reconceive the structure of their products.
Harper Collins has moved to the Financial District, and SL Green, who purchased the building in 2012, hired TPG Architecture to reconceive and renovate this well-known Plaza-district skyscraper.
The was He said: "We reconceive some of the pieces so it's a lot more rock 'n' roll.
counters, on biblical warrants, that we should reconceive eschatological bliss as delight in God's self-gift, both intellectual and bodily, and hence still centered on the incarnate Christ, exercised in a realm of transformed, not abolished, temporality and spatiality.
The impetus behind these new guidelines and format is not the desire to discard the conventions of the theatre review simply for the sake of doing so, but rather the desire to reconceive the genre itself: I would like Shakespeare Bulletin theatre reviews to be vividly expressed perspectives on performance rather than meticulously detailed records of performance.