reconception

reconception

(ˌriːkənˈsɛpʃən)
n
formal a new or different conception
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In an analysis (NCRonline.org/node/175061), ecclesiologist Richard Gaillardetz writes: "In the prologue of the constitution, we already encounter what will be the overarching theme of the document, its reconception of the work of the Curia as an exercise not in domination and control but in Christian service inspired by Jesus' ministry of foot-washing."
This can require an almost complete reconception of an existing building's interior floor plan as well as its exterior facade.
Frank Folsom Smith, the architect who, in 1969, designed the 17-story Terrace--then, and now, the tallest building in unincorporated Sarasota County--calls it "far more than a renovation; it's a reconception."
unwittingly produced a fundamental reconception of nature itself into
Finally, Francis Bacon is brought into the discussion to declare war on "the human subjection to the dominion and limits of nature." Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, Descartes--these thinkers laid the foundation for classical liberalism, with its "revolutionary reconception of politics, society, science, and nature." Over time, this tradition redefined liberty as "liberation ...
This reconception of the Scriptures as interactive embodied communication between God and human beings opens a new range of pastoral possibilities for the proclamation of the Word.
However, one of our biggest challenges is the reconception of what "search results" look like in the TDM world.
By blurring the distinction between politicians and citizens, audience members and participants, City Council Meeting is intended to spur a reconception of the limitations and opportunities for political engagement on a local level.
Our book insists, against the grain of established cultural expectations, upon Romantic continuities, recurrences, and proliferation." I wonder if textbook anthologies might not be fairly innocuous windmills rather than the pernicious giants that Carr and Robinson seem to think them, but the reconception of Romanticism offered here is interesting and provocative for its rejection of a liberal-progressive narrative of literary history.
"The ambiguities of transnationalism, the postnational reconception of nation-space as competing ethnicities and the emergence of a diasporic regionalism," she explains (p.
It's a complete reconception of the King Kong myth.