reconquest


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re·con·quest

 (rē-kŏng′kwĕst)
n.
1. The retaking of a territory previously lost in war.
2. The defeat or subjugation of a previously subjugated group of people by force of arms.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reconquest

(ˌriːˈkɒŋkwɛst)
n
(Military) the act of conquering a country or territory again after having lost it
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

reconquest

[ˈriːˈkɒŋkwest] Nreconquista f
the Reconquest [of Spain] → la Reconquista
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

reconquest

n (of town, territory)Zurückeroberung f; (of enemy)erneuter Sieg (→ of über +acc)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
'Mir Chakar Khan Rind popularly known as Chakar-e-Azam was a 16th-century Baloch poet/saint who was popularized in the Baloch epic Hani and is said to have aided Mughal emperor Humayun in his reconquest of the sub-continent.
The appearance of Mudejar art in Spain around the 12th century was due to the peculiar political, social and cultural conditions of the Christian reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula.
It is about pushing forward the ruthless reconquest by the regime," they noted.
The party understands its political quest as a "reconquista" (reconquest), and in an act full of symbolism started the election campaign on April 12 in Covadonga, in the northern region of Asturias, where the Christian King Don Pelayo defeated the Muslim troops in the year 722.
The Vox Party leader, Santiago Abascal, says he wants "a reconquest of Spain" referencing the Moorish control, which ended in 1492.
In a speech to the Turkey Youth Foundation in Istanbul, Saturday, Erdogan affirmed his country's support for the Palestinians before saying that "the Jews in Israel kick men, but also women and children, when they're on the ground." He said that "as Muslims, we deal with people directly, and if there are people who are brave enough to provoke us, we will teach them a lesson." Erdogan also told the audience, "Don't be like the Jews." Some Turkish journalists tweeted that some in the crowd called out for Erdogan to bring about the Muslim reconquest of Jerusalem.
He is the author of Warfare in Roman Europe, AD 350-425 in 1998, and Frontiers of the Roman Empire in 2012) covers the rise of Christianity, the key Church Councils, the fall of the West to the Barbarians, the Justinianic reconquest, and concludes with the twin wars against Persians and Arabs in the seventh century AD.
Julia Budka examines the intersection of archaeology, politics, administration, and cult during the reconquest of Nubia in the New Kingdom based on the case study of Sai Island.
Classicists with a variety of specialties look at the mutuality of theological and philosophical methods and interests in the two halves of the former Roman Empire during its final period, between the reconquest of Constantinople in 1261 by Michael VIII Palaiologis, to the aftermath of the city's fall to the Ottomans in 1453.
Chapter 3 is a brilliant reconstruction of a series of legends and stories (that themselves tell social and cultural stories about reconquest mentality).
The Christian victory marked the completion of the long Christian reconquest of Spain and ended seven centuries in which Christians, Muslims and Jews had, for the most part, lived peacefully and profitably together.