recourse


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Related to recourse: Without recourse, have recourse to

re·course

 (rē′kôrs′, rĭ-kôrs′)
n.
1. The act or an instance of turning to or making use of a person or thing for aid or in an effort to achieve something: have recourse to the courts.
2. One that is turned to or made use of for aid or security: His only recourse was the police.
3. Law The right of a creditor to demand payment from an endorser or guarantor when the primary debtor fails to pay.

[Middle English recours, from Old French, from Latin recursus, a running back, from past participle of recurrere, to run back : re-, re- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recourse

(rɪˈkɔːs)
n
1. the act of resorting to a person, course of action, etc, in difficulty or danger (esp in the phrase have recourse to)
2. a person, organization, or course of action that is turned to for help, protection, etc
3. (Law) the right to demand payment, esp from the drawer or endorser of a bill of exchange or other negotiable instrument when the person accepting it fails to pay
4. (Law) without recourse a qualified endorsement on such a negotiable instrument, by which the endorser protects himself or herself from liability to subsequent holders
[C14: from Old French recours, from Late Latin recursus a running back, from re- + currere to run]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•course

(ˈri kɔrs, -koʊrs, rɪˈkɔrs, -ˈkoʊrs)

n.
1. access or resort to a person or thing for help or protection.
2. a person or thing resorted to for help or protection.
3. the right to collect from a maker or endorser of a negotiable instrument.
[1350–1400; Middle English recours < Old French < Late Latin recursus, Latin: return, withdrawal, derivative of recurrere to run back]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recourse - act of turning to for assistance; "have recourse to the courts"; "an appeal to his uncle was his last resort"
assist, assistance, help, aid - the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "he gave me an assist with the housework"; "could not walk without assistance"; "rescue party went to their aid"; "offered his help in unloading"
2.recourse - something or someone turned to for assistance or security; "his only recourse was the police"; "took refuge in lying"
resource - a source of aid or support that may be drawn upon when needed; "the local library is a valuable resource"
shadow - refuge from danger or observation; "he felt secure in his father's shadow"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recourse

noun option, choice, alternative, resort, appeal, resource, remedy, way out, refuge, expedient The public believes its only recourse is to take to the streets.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

recourse

noun
That to which one turns for help when in desperation:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

recourse

[rɪˈkɔːs] N to have recourse torecurrir a
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recourse

[rɪˈkɔːrs] nrecours m
to have recourse to → recourir à, avoir recours à
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

recourse

nZuflucht f; to have recourse to somebodysich an jdn wenden; to have recourse to somethingZuflucht zu etw nehmen; without recourse to his booksohne seine Bücher zu konsultieren; without recourse (Fin) → ohne Regress
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recourse

[rɪˈkɔːs] n (frm) to have recourse toricorrere a, far ricorso a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

recourse

n. recurso, auxilio.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

recourse

n recurso
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The first time he had recourse to his new judge was when a French prisoner, a colonel, came to him and, after talking a great deal about his exploits, concluded by making what amounted to a demand that Pierre should give him four thousand francs to send to his wife and children.
In his account of the mission, where his veracity is most to be suspected, he neither exaggerates overmuch the merits of the Jesuits, if we consider the partial regard paid by the Portuguese to their countrymen, by the Jesuits to their society, and by the Papists to their church, nor aggravates the vices of the Abyssins; but if the reader will not be satisfied with a Popish account of a Popish mission, he may have recourse to the history of the church of Abyssinia, written by Dr.
They are compelled, therefore, to have recourse to those houses whose history contains moving incidents like these.
He knew what makes a soldier, and judging by the appearance and the talk of those persons, by the swagger with which they had recourse to the bottle on the journey, he considered them poor soldiers.
"This must not be," I thought I heard him say: "either he must listen to reason, or I must have recourse to the last resource of civilization." Then, addressing me in a louder tone, he hurriedly exclaimed, "Listen: no stranger must witness what you have witnessed.
Again, as on the preceding day, I had recourse to earthly tactics, and swinging my right fist full upon the point of his chin I followed it with a smashing left to the pit of his stomach.
You must know there are two ways of contesting,[*] the one by the law, the other by force; the first method is proper to men, the second to beasts; but because the first is frequently not sufficient, it is necessary to have recourse to the second.
Astor had been obliged to have recourse to British subjects experienced in the Canadian fur trade; henceforth it was his intention, as much as possible, to select Americans, so as to secure an ascendency of American influence in the management of the company, and to make it decidedly national.
He therefore had recourse to his usual receipt of patience, for, though he was not a great adept in Latin, he remembered, and well understood, the advice contained in these words
Finding, then, that, in fact he could not move, he thought himself of having recourse to his usual remedy, which was to think of some passage in his books, and his craze brought to his mind that about Baldwin and the Marquis of Mantua, when Carloto left him wounded on the mountain side, a story known by heart by the children, not forgotten by the young men, and lauded and even believed by the old folk; and for all that not a whit truer than the miracles of Mahomet.
The weaker States or confederacies would first have recourse to them, to put themselves upon an equality with their more potent neighbors.