recoveree

recoveree

(rɪˌkʌvəˈriː)
n
a person found against in a recovery case, from whom costs or property are recovered
References in periodicals archive ?
Adams and Reese in Tampa helped make a wish come true through its sponsorship of a recent reception to benefit Make-A-Wish Southern Florida at the Bank of America Plaza, where it was revealed that Make-A-Wish would send four-year-old cancer recoveree Ellie York and her family to the San Diego Zoo.
Just as the recovering person needs support and direction, so does the family of the recoveree. In 2013, Michael Mendel Galer, MEd, and I (coauthor Davila) created and implemented a two-day seminar entitled Recovery Family Mentor.
I have long entertained the fantasy that some interviewer someday is going to turn to one of the recovered sufferers and say, "But isn't this just another way of saying that you're a wretched little worm who acted despicably just to rise in your dreadful firm or impress the girls?" Of course, the recoveree will simply say, "Yes, you're right.
A new term, "recoveree," was developed to designate appropriately those persons who would receive the calls.
An attempt was made to contact each recoveree weekly.
One recoveree received the message upon returning from a residential treatment setting and called to express his appreciation.
Philosophically, they were concerned first and foremost with what works best for the recoveree. This illustrates community organizations collaborating to the benefit of those in recovery.
This level of support is noninvasive, makes no demands of the recoveree except that he/she has a telephone, and is conducted at the recoveree's request.
An honor student, the boy even became the designated tutor for the children of fellow recoverees in the parish.
But the beauty of a community-based program, Labastilla said, is that surrenderees have regular interactions both with fellow recoverees and their families.
Meanwhile, part of the initiative of the local government of Bauang is the provision of P100,000 each to drug-cleared barangays which will be utilized for the livelihood of the drug recoverees.
So many of the memoirs published today conjure up the dysfunctional, sensational or celebrity life, or the up, down and up again lives of recoverees. In such works the past is less revealing than titillating, and the context is usually no larger than the moment, leaving the reader with no greater understanding of the ways in which the personal, cultural and historical threads are woven into the tapestry of a life.