recurrence


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re·cur

 (rĭ-kûr′)
intr.v. re·curred, re·cur·ring, re·curs
1. To happen or occur again or repeatedly: The pain recurred after eating.
2. To return to one's attention or memory: The thought recurred to her late at night.
3. To return in thought or discourse: He recurred to the subject right after dinner.
4. Archaic To have recourse; resort: "When ... direct taxes are not necessary, they will not be recurred to" (James Madison).

[Latin recurrere : re-, re- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

re·cur′rence n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recurrence - happening again (especially at regular intervals); "the return of spring"
repeat, repetition - an event that repeats; "the events today were a repeat of yesterday's"
atavism, throwback, reversion - a reappearance of an earlier characteristic
flashback - an unexpected but vivid recurrence of a past experience (especially a recurrence of the effects of an hallucinogenic drug taken much earlier)

recurrence

noun fresh outbreak, repeat, repetition, deterioration, recrudescence Police are out in force to prevent a recurrence of the violence.

recurrence

noun
A repeated occurrence:
Translations
تَكْرار، مُعاوَدَة المَرَض
nový výskyt
tilbagefald
endurtekning
nový výskyt
tekrarlama

recurrence

[rɪˈkʌrəns] N [of event, mistake, theme] → repetición f (Med) → reaparición f, recurrencia f

recurrence

[rɪˈkʌrəns] n [problem, illness, symptoms, injury] → réapparition f; [event, pattern] → répétition f; [theme, idea] → retour m

recurrence

nWiederkehr f; (of error, event)Wiederholung f; (of problem, symptoms also)erneutes Auftreten; (of idea, theme)Wiederauftauchen nt; (of dream)Wiederkehr f; let there be no recurrence of thisdas darf nie wieder vorkommen

recurrence

[rɪˈkʌrns] n (of pain, dream, violence) → ripetersi m; (of injury, problem) → ripresentarsi m; (of disease, symptoms) → ricomparsa; (of idea, theme) → ricorrenza

recur

(riˈkəː) past tense, past participle reˈcurred verb
to happen again; to come back again. This problem keeps recurring.
reˈcurrence (-ˈka-) , ((American) -ˈkə:-) noun
He has had several recurrences of his illness.
reˈcurrent (-ˈka-) , ((American) -ˈkə:-) adjective
happening often or regularly. a recurrent nightmare.

re·cur·rence

n. recidiva.
1. reaparición de síntomas después de una remisión;
2. relapso, recaída.

recurrence

n recurrencia
References in classic literature ?
Although the figure of Zarathustra and a large number of the leading thoughts in this work had appeared much earlier in the dreams and writings of the author, "Thus Spake Zarathustra" did not actually come into being until the month of August 1881 in Sils Maria; and it was the idea of the Eternal Recurrence of all things which finally induced my brother to set forth his new views in poetic language.
The observable fact is that, when a certain complex of stimuli has originally caused a certain complex of reactions, the recurrence of part of the stimuli tends to cause the recurrence of the whole of the reactions.
Its recurrence was regular, but as slow as the tolling of a death knell.
But it was a comfort that there could be no uneasiness in a connection with anything so beatific as the radiant image of my little girl, the vision of whose angelic beauty had probably more than anything else to do with the restlessness that, before morning, made me several times rise and wander about my room to take in the whole picture and prospect; to watch, from my open window, the faint summer dawn, to look at such portions of the rest of the house as I could catch, and to listen, while, in the fading dusk, the first birds began to twitter, for the possible recurrence of a sound or two, less natural and not without, but within, that I had fancied I heard.
But there appear to be insuperable objections against the proposed recurrence to the people, as a provision in all cases for keeping the several departments of power within their constitutional limits.
My only alternative seemed to lie in flight and my decision was crystallized by a recurrence of the rustling sound from the thing which now seemed, in the darkness of the cave and to my distorted imagination, to be creeping stealthily upon me.
Presently I found, by the frequent recurrence of some sound which the stranger repeated after them, that she was endeavouring to learn their language; and the idea instantly occurred to me that I should make use of the same instructions to the same end.
Let me add that I intend to prevent any recurrence of your little adventure of last night.
Though this was only a recurrence of what had happened before, it struck all present as if it had been death, not only from its contrast with the completeness of the revival, but because his words had all had reference to the possibility that his death was near.
The idea of terrible energy thus forced upon him was new at every recurrence, and seemed to affect him as disagreeably, and with almost as much surprise, the hundredth time as the first.
The mere recurrence to those songs, even now, afflicts me; and while I am writing these lines, an expression of feeling has already found its way down my cheek.
His emotion on entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such, as, in Elinor's conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne, or the consciousness of its being known to others; and she soon discovered in his melancholy eye and varying complexion as he looked at her sister, the probable recurrence of many past scenes of misery to his mind, brought back by that resemblance between Marianne and Eliza already acknowledged, and now strengthened by the hollow eye, the sickly skin, the posture of reclining weakness, and the warm acknowledgment of peculiar obligation.