recursiveness


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recursiveness

(rɪˈkɜːsɪvnɪs)
n
the ability to be repeated indefinitely
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
What do the inherent reflexivity, recursiveness and limits of all and any peoples' anthropologies render for us to write and think about, and live within?
At word level especially compounding is a word formation process where recursiveness is more widely attested.
She writes that the Cold War has "continued to enjoy a persisting recursiveness when seen as a structure of feeling, a knowledge project, and a hermeneutics for interpreting developments in the 'post'-Cold War conjuncture."
The sustainability practices, which are part of the ILS formation, are indicated by the recursiveness of practices in the transformation of the system (Ortner, 1984), which are observed in the use of sharing bicycles by indirect actions.
I took recursiveness in this context to involve a developing relationship between readers and texts, viewed as a matter of form and rhetoric.
(37) But while Lewis Carroll stresses that successful understanding will only take us to the point from which we departed and confront us with further problems of meaning, the very notion of recursiveness is linked, in the A lice books, to the idea that readers must choose a backward movement toward childhood and to a world of origins from which they are to progress if they are to come to any understanding at all.
Performing great and the purpose of performing better than others: On the recursiveness of the achievement goal adoption process.