recusancy


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rec·u·sant

 (rĕk′yə-zənt, rĭ-kyo͞o′-)
n.
1. One of the Roman Catholics in England who incurred legal and social penalties in the 1500s and afterward for refusing to attend services of the Church of England.
2. A dissenter; a nonconformist.

rec′u·san·cy n.
rec′u·sant adj.

recusancy

resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance.recusant, n., adj.
See also: Renunciation
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance. — recusant, n., adj.
See also: Catholicism
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also called recusance. — recusant, n., adj.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recusancy - refusal to submit to established authority; originally the refusal of Roman Catholics to attend services of the Church of England
direct action - a protest action by labor or minority groups to obtain their demands
References in classic literature ?
It was as much injured by its charges in fitting out an armament against the Spaniards, during the time of the Armada, as by the fines and confiscations levied on it by Elizabeth for harbouring of priests, obstinate recusancy, and popish misdoings.
Modern scholars such as Hugh Aveling have speculated that the play was specially written for the troupe by clerics associated with the nearby Grosmont Priory, Whitby, a well-known centre of recusancy (290).
Matters of social status, gender, and geography; Reformation, recusancy, and puritan opposition to recreations and pastimes; literacy, orality, and memory, are all woven into a rich synthesis of historical evidence.
By sonic Socratic dub nett recusancy obversive deduct interval exfold, train up pitch departures, percuss the air punctual let addit pressure point, aqueous gearing will screen hyperbaric fully virtual it is separation.
Almost nothing is known about his wife, apart from his one mention of her to Drummond as "a shrew yet honest" (102) and their linking in a charge of recusancy immediately following the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot (228); after 1619, Donaldson can say only that Jonson was either living apart from his wife or she was dead.
might have done more to probe the vagaries of recorded recusancy rates as a reliable indicator of the overall strength of Catholic commitment regionally and nationally.
It became a secret centre of Catholic recusancy even though some of the Friars were persecuted and became martyrs.
Nor is his possible recusancy seen as sufficient grounds for his adoption as a talisman by the Irish.
Lowell's recusancy not only from Catholicism but from the elegance of his first two collections and his re-emergence in Life Studies (1959) as an inmate of his life and times in poems like "Memories of West Street and Lepke" is a similar example of the acceptance that was taking place in the rockbottom paradox of the final lines of Carruth's poem.
None of this can prove anything about William Shakespeare's own private convictions [as Miola rightly points out]; but we do know that his daughter was fined for recusancy and that William and his fiancee Anne Hathaway married not in his Stratford church but in Temple Grafton, five miles from his birthplace.
Political and religious tensions were running high, for the accession of Charles I and his young Catholic bride, the French princess Henrietta Maria--along with the Privy Council's suspension of recusancy laws, which was part of the marriage settlement--had stimulated fears of a Catholic resurgence in the country.