recusancy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rec·u·sant

 (rĕk′yə-zənt, rĭ-kyo͞o′-)
n.
1. One of the Roman Catholics in England who incurred legal and social penalties in the 1500s and afterward for refusing to attend services of the Church of England.
2. A dissenter; a nonconformist.

rec′u·san·cy n.
rec′u·sant adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recusancy

resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance.recusant, n., adj.
See also: Renunciation
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance. — recusant, n., adj.
See also: Catholicism
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also called recusance. — recusant, n., adj.
See also: Religion
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recusancy - refusal to submit to established authority; originally the refusal of Roman Catholics to attend services of the Church of England
direct action - a protest action by labor or minority groups to obtain their demands
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It was as much injured by its charges in fitting out an armament against the Spaniards, during the time of the Armada, as by the fines and confiscations levied on it by Elizabeth for harbouring of priests, obstinate recusancy, and popish misdoings.
In keeping with the recusancy marking this marriage, they are undecided on how to celebrate or where to go.
Snowden observes, 'was consistent with the punitive tenor of the Wehrmacht occupation strategy.' (64) In subsequent war trials, Rodenwaldt successfully adduced his colonial sympathy with mixed-race people to assist in his exoneration: he implied that his earlier studies of the Mestizos of Kisar demonstrated a fundamental racial recusancy, the refusal of Nazi doctrine.
Elizabeth Hastings, the mother of Francis Beaumont Senior and grandmother of Francis Beaumont Junior, battled against the recusancy laws in the 1580s, refusing to pay her fines.
Great Britain tolerates dissent from the national church, but does not recognize the right of dissent; and barbarous laws against recusancy still disgrace her statute-books, though rarely enforced.
The Benedictine lay sister Cecilie Price, who had been imprisoned for her recusancy in England, 'which she most Patiently and Joyfully courageously suffred', maintained a self-imposed life of adversity in the cloisters of Brussels and Ghent.
The need for opposition to recusancy is prominent in Daborne's thinking, while the sermon ends with a warm allusion to the "memory of Elizabeth" followed by a tribute to "our Solomon"--that is, to King James.
What is it in her dialogue with Parolles that alters her tone from despairing recusancy in her first soliloquy to confident, moral purposiveness in her second?
In 1580, she married Thomas Fitzherbert (1552-1640), who had been imprisoned for recusancy in 1572, after he had been at Oxford University (in 1568) and come under the influence of Edmund Campion.
Christopher "where the entertainment represents the administration of a sacrament" ("Recusancy" 111).
Almost nothing is known about his wife, apart from his one mention of her to Drummond as "a shrew yet honest" (102) and their linking in a charge of recusancy immediately following the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot (228); after 1619, Donaldson can say only that Jonson was either living apart from his wife or she was dead.