red alder


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Noun1.red alder - large tree of Pacific coast of North America having hard red wood much used for furniturered alder - large tree of Pacific coast of North America having hard red wood much used for furniture
Alnus, genus Alnus - alders
alder tree, alder - north temperate shrubs or trees having toothed leaves and conelike fruit; bark is used in tanning and dyeing and the wood is rot-resistant
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punaleppä
References in periodicals archive ?
The sale includes a mix of old- and young-growth Sitka spruce, western hemlock, red alder, western red cedar, and Alaska yellow cedar.
The roots of red alder host a special fungus that fixes nitrogen in the soil as a natural fertilizer.
The potential for limiting fungal attack on red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) pallet stock was evaluated in a small-scale field test.
Most reported occurrence data come from incidental captures from larger trapping efforts and have demonstrated a strong affinity for Red Alder (Alnus rubra) trees.
Senior living community Capital Senior Living (NYSE:CSU) said on Monday that it has reached an agreement, including customary standstill and voting commitments, in connection with its 2016 annual meeting of stockholders with Lucus Advisors, an investment management firm overseeing funds including Red Alder Master Fund.
* Red alder has morphed from a nuisance tree to a respected hardwood in North America and beyond.
In the Kenai National Forest willows re-sprouted following mechanical treatment whereas mature red alder (A.
The move has been prompted by pressure from investors Engine Capital LP and Red Alder LLC, with the two hedge funds pushing for a sale to a private equity firm or a large global retailer, Reuters was informed.
RED ALDER IS A WEST COAST HARDWOOD that has undergone an impressive evolution.
Hart SC, Binkley D, Perry DA (1997) Influence of red alder on soil nitrogen transformations in two conifer forests of contrasting productivity.