red ocher


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Related to red ocher: yellow ocher

red ocher

n.
A form of hematite used as a red pigment.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

red′ o′cher


n.
any of the red natural earths, mixtures of hematite, that are used as pigments.
[1565–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ancient Egyptians used castor, olive and sesame oils along with copper, lead and red ocher to make cosmetic and dermatological products in the form of unguents, creams, pomades, rouges, powders, and eye and nail paints.
The adrenal glands of Bactrian camel located bilaterally in the retroperitoneum superior and above the kidney, were reddish or red ocher, and each adrenal gland about 12 (g) in weight.
The forehead and cheeks are painted with red ocher powder.
For example, she asks why red ocher, "iron earth," is a plentiful and inexpensive pigment, explaining that the answer "can be found in the stars, and in nuclear fusion.
The bones were placed in the grave and sprinkled with red ocher, a mineral used in ancient funeral rites.
bole (also called red ocher, ruddle, or raddle: a moderate reddish brown)
At a Pinnacle Point cave, Arizona State University paleoanthropologist Curtis Marean and colleagues found evidence that humans were making complex tools and using red ocher pigment 164,000 years ago.
This pottery was made of gray clay, porous with fragments of sandy stones, medium hard and painted in red ocher. Other utensils made of colored glass were found, decorated with fish and flower patterns.
Painted red ocher in the 18th century to honor the arrival of Sweden's King Gustav III, they are preserved today as private residences.
But the newly discovered chunks of red ocher from Blombos were clearly left by a humanlike hand.
So also was red ocher, still in later traditions the surrogate of the life-giving or menstrual blood of woman.
They used the color vermilion, made by mixing berry juices and fat, on their faces and arm markings as well as bright red ocher, bloodroot, and white and yellow clays.