red spruce


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Related to red spruce: white spruce

red spruce

n.
An eastern North American spruce (Picea rubens) having yellow-green needles and reddish-brown cones and inner bark.

red′ spruce′


n.
a spruce, Picea rubens, of NE North America, having reddish brown inner bark and yielding a light, soft wood.
[1770–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.red spruce - medium-sized spruce of eastern North Americared spruce - medium-sized spruce of eastern North America; chief lumber spruce of the area; source of pulpwood
spruce - any coniferous tree of the genus Picea
References in periodicals archive ?
The roof lasts about 30 40 years when it is made from red spruce and 30 when it is made from white spruce.
This year, the city's tree for the traditional Christmas market on RE[micro]merberg is a red spruce that's 33 meters (108 feet) high, 124 years old and weighs just under nine tons.
They dwell in the red spruce or yellow birch trees as they need plenty of leaf cover - being sheltered from the sun is important so that they do not dry out.
OTTAWA -- You might say President Benigno Aquino III wanted to bask in his mother's shadow when he planted his red spruce right next to a taller red maple planted in 1989 by the late President Corazon C.
Named for the rare salamander indigenous to the Cheat Mountain region, the Cheat Mountain Salamander reaches into the highly elevated Cheat Mountain region where Red Spruce is common and mighty rivers have their source.
papyrifera) hardwoods, and coniferous stands of balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and red spruce (Picea rubens.) While heavily forested, timber harvesting is common throughout as the majority of the land is privately owned and commercially harvested (NEFA 2007).
Natural and anthropogenic disturbance history has significantly altered the landscape and continues to impact the habitat of endemic species such as the endangered Carolina Northern flying squirrel (CNFS, Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus), a Pleistocene relict that uses the montane northern hardwood and red spruce (Picea rubens)-Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) forests for denning sites and foraging areas [4-6].
Who would be surprised that the allowable cut calculated in 1926 for a red spruce forest in the Adirondack mountains using six different methods gave six different figures!
Data included stumpage prices for sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt.), white ash (Fraxinus americana L.), red oak (mostly northern red oak [Quercus rubra L.]), eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.), spruce-fir (mostly red spruce [Picea rubens Sarg.] with some balsam fir [Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.] and small amounts of black spruce [P.
In a 1925 article in the Scientific Monthly titled "The Vanishing Spruce," referred to the high elevation red spruce (Picea rubens) as a "lost tribe." The lost tribe of red spruce the authors were referring to found refuge in the high elevations in the central Appalachian region during a warming period that took place after the Wisconsin glaciation--part of the last Ice Age, which ended approximately 10,000 years ago.
The Pygmy Salamander (Desmognathus wrighti) is a small terrestrial plethodontid salamander typically associated with red spruce (Picea rubens) and Fraser's fir (Abies fraseri) forest in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (Harrison, 2000).
The boreal forest has only seven - black and red spruce, juniper, balsam fir, white birch, tamarack and an occasional white pine.