redact

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re·dact

 (rĭ-dăkt′)
tr.v. re·dact·ed, re·dact·ing, re·dacts
1. To draw up or frame (a proclamation, for example).
2. To make ready for publication; edit or revise.
3. To delete or remove (private or sensitive information) from a document in preparation for publication.

[Middle English redacten, from Latin redigere, redāct-, to drive back : re-, red-, re- + agere, to drive; see act.]

re·dac′tor (-dăk′tər, -tôr′) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

redact

(rɪˈdækt)
vb (tr)
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to compose or draft (an edict, proclamation, etc)
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) to put (a literary work, etc) into appropriate form for publication; edit
[C15: from Latin redigere to bring back, from red- re- + agere to drive]
reˈdaction n
reˈdactional adj
reˈdactor n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•dact

(rɪˈdækt)

v.t.
to put into suitable literary form; edit.
[1830–40; < Latin redāctus, past participle of redigere to drive back, restore]
re•dac′tion, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

redact


Past participle: redacted
Gerund: redacting

Imperative
redact
redact
Present
I redact
you redact
he/she/it redacts
we redact
you redact
they redact
Preterite
I redacted
you redacted
he/she/it redacted
we redacted
you redacted
they redacted
Present Continuous
I am redacting
you are redacting
he/she/it is redacting
we are redacting
you are redacting
they are redacting
Present Perfect
I have redacted
you have redacted
he/she/it has redacted
we have redacted
you have redacted
they have redacted
Past Continuous
I was redacting
you were redacting
he/she/it was redacting
we were redacting
you were redacting
they were redacting
Past Perfect
I had redacted
you had redacted
he/she/it had redacted
we had redacted
you had redacted
they had redacted
Future
I will redact
you will redact
he/she/it will redact
we will redact
you will redact
they will redact
Future Perfect
I will have redacted
you will have redacted
he/she/it will have redacted
we will have redacted
you will have redacted
they will have redacted
Future Continuous
I will be redacting
you will be redacting
he/she/it will be redacting
we will be redacting
you will be redacting
they will be redacting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been redacting
you have been redacting
he/she/it has been redacting
we have been redacting
you have been redacting
they have been redacting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been redacting
you will have been redacting
he/she/it will have been redacting
we will have been redacting
you will have been redacting
they will have been redacting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been redacting
you had been redacting
he/she/it had been redacting
we had been redacting
you had been redacting
they had been redacting
Conditional
I would redact
you would redact
he/she/it would redact
we would redact
you would redact
they would redact
Past Conditional
I would have redacted
you would have redacted
he/she/it would have redacted
we would have redacted
you would have redacted
they would have redacted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redact - someone who puts text into appropriate form for publication
abbreviator, abridger - one who shortens or abridges or condenses a written work
editor, editor in chief - a person responsible for the editorial aspects of publication; the person who determines the final content of a text (especially of a newspaper or magazine)
Verb1.redact - formulate in a particular style or language; "I wouldn't put it that way"; "She cast her request in very polite language"
give voice, phrase, word, articulate, formulate - put into words or an expression; "He formulated his concerns to the board of trustees"
2.redact - prepare for publication or presentation by correcting, revising, or adapting; "Edit a book on lexical semantics"; "she edited the letters of the politician so as to omit the most personal passages"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
interpolate, alter, falsify - insert words into texts, often falsifying it thereby
cut up, hack - significantly cut up a manuscript
black out - suppress by censorship as for political reasons; "parts of the newspaper article were blacked out"
blank out - cut out, as for political reasons; "several line in the report were blanked out"
copyedit, copyread, subedit - edit and correct (written or printed material)
bracket out, bracket - place into brackets; "Please bracket this remark"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

redact

[rɪˈdækt] VTredactar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
At first sight such a work seems to be a miscellany of myths, technical advice, moral precepts, and folklore maxims without any unifying principle; and critics have readily taken the view that the whole is a canto of fragments or short poems worked up by a redactor. Very probably Hesiod used much material of a far older date, just as Shakespeare used the "Gesta Romanorum", old chronicles, and old plays; but close inspection will show that the "Works and Days" has a real unity and that the picturesque title is somewhat misleading.
Casaubon had been slow and hesitating, oppressed in the plan of transmitting his work, as he had been in executing it, by the sense of moving heavily in a dim and clogging medium: distrust of Dorothea's competence to arrange what he had prepared was subdued only by distrust of any other redactor. But he had come at last to create a trust for himself out of Dorothea's nature: she could do what she resolved to do: and he willingly imagined her toiling under the fetters of a promise to erect a tomb with his name upon it.
The significance of research on the tripartite structure in the sugyot in general stems from the fact that very few studies have examined the sugyot from the perspective of their stylistic form, evident in the Babylonian Talmud as a stylistic formative unit and as part of the redactors' considerations when editing the contents of the Babylonian Talmud (Valler 1995, 169; Valler 1999, 10).
Through the redactors we view an embroidered version, not of what went down, but of what went wrong with Israel's leaders.
Williamson argues that Isaiah 10:1-4 is not "displaced," but a key piece in redactors' recognition that Isaiah's prophecies had been at least partly fulfilled in the destruction of Jerusalem and subsequent exiles, giving rise to the announcement of liberation in the second half of the book.
The contributions are unified by little other than their adherence to a model of composition that emphasizes the formative role played by editors (or "redactors") in the composition process.
"They are murder investigators, not redactors, and that resulted in no schedule as to why matters were redacted.
The documents were then braided together in antiquity by one or more editors, usually called redactors; Dr Baden believes that there was only a single redactor, whom he styles the compiler.
Two variants of redactors were established within the solution.
early modern redactors adapted them to emphasize the features of private
Recent attention has emphasized the labors of the redactors, unnamed "Stammaim," who shaped the ultimate form of the Babylonian Talmud (Bavli).
Kerby-Fulton argues that women's visionary experiences were taken seriously by their male redactors with some, like Birgitta of Sweden, being "seriously authorized" by their transmitters and others, like Julian of Norwich (as discussed in Jonathan Juilfs's contribution to the volume), undergoing a process of containment through "abridgement and revisionist biography" (2).