redbay


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redbay

(ˈrɛdˌbeɪ)
n
(Plants) a small tree which grows in the southern United States and whose inner wood is of a dark red colour
References in periodicals archive ?
A fungal symbiont of the redbay ambrosia beetle causes a lethal wilt in redbay and other Lauraceae in the southeastern United States.
The disease was first discovered near Savannah, Georgia, in 2002 and quickly spread through redbay trees in coastal forests.
The disease is a consequence of the invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, originally from Asia and introduced in the USA in wooden packing material.
Grab a sweet, flaky kouignamann pastry from Firebrand Artisan Breads (firebrand bread.com), then take it a few doors down to the shipping-container outpost of local roaster Red Bay Coffee (redbay coffee.com) in the industrial-chic Hive courtyard.
(2010) New combinations in Raffaelea, Ambrosiella, and Hyalorhinocladiella, and four new species from the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus.
It also has nearly wiped out trees that were once major parts of coastal forests in the Southeast, including swampbay and redbay trees.
The fungus, carried by redbay ambrosia beetles, causes a vascular disease called laurel wilt; more than 90 percent of trees die within six weeks of infection.
These include redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, with its associated fungus Rafaela lauricola into the southeastern United States (Fraederich et al.
North american lauraceae: terpenoid emissions relative attraction and boring preferences of redbay ambrosia beetle Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).
Sweetbay (Magnolia Virginiana), also called swamp-bay, white-bay, laurel, swamp, or sweet magnolia, and swamp-laurel, is at times confused with loblolly-bay and redbay, since "bay" is the term commonly used in referring to any of these three species.
Impact of saltwater flooding on red maple, redbay, and Chinese tallow seedlings.
A fungal symbiont of the redbay ambrosia beetle causes a lethal will in redbay and other Lauraceae in the southeastern United States.