rediscuss

rediscuss

(ˌriːdɪˈskʌs)
vb (tr)
to discuss again
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
, an plum need Then the plumber's plans changed, so we needed to rediscuss and renegotiate.
Or when some ministry, because it has such authority, deems it necessary to rediscuss the use of a certain agrochemical, seeking toxicological evaluation (or reevaluation) thereof, which may be conducted by the Brazilian government Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA; National Health Surveillance Agency) or by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renovaveis).
Specifically, it does not imply that Milena should adapt her decisions to new circumstances or that she ought to self-revoke her power when the circumstances change such that it would be preferable to rediscuss how the right to rule should be assigned.
She also directed the board to rediscuss and confirm all matters voted at its Dec.
Hence, the Committee requested the Secretariat to rediscuss the issue of scheduling of ketamine in the next meeting of the WHO Expert Committee of Drug Dependence.
They flaunt it: she is their dear Jane, their matchless Jane, and they are her cult, her sect, her little company (fit though few), her tribe of adorers who discuss and rediscuss the miracle of her work in extravagant, patently hyperbolic terms.
"Sometimes things are a bit puzzling - they agree on something [but] they don't write it, they don't agree on it completely then they go and rediscuss it with their groups", said Mahmoud Othman, an independent Kurdish politician involved in the drafting.
Instead, he must return for renegotiations with the latter to rediscuss sharing the surplus.
Clearly, some new advances in economic thinking have to take place and perhaps time is today ripe to reevaluate and rediscuss the very roots of economic analysis, particularly at the macroeconomic level.
These interventions were heavily applauded, to the extent that the head of the EPP group, Joseph Daul (France), began to backpedal by acknowledging that this decision was "perhaps too quick" and by calling on the groups to rediscuss the matter.